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Vintage walks the walk in retro show at Heinz History Center

| Thursday, April 11, 2013, 9:21 p.m.
James Knox | Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
Modcloth stylists Nicole Czapinski (left) and Emily Seibel work to style an outfit that Seibel has on Wednesday April 3, 2013 inside the photo studio of the vintage clothing internet store headquarters in Pittsburgh. Seibel is wearing the 'Stand the Tesserae of Time' dress' and 'Hollywood Thrills' sunglasses and carrying 'Throw It in Neutral' bag, all available at www.modcloth.com.
James Knox | Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
Modcloth stylists Nicole Czapinski (right) and Emilt Seibel work to style an outfit that Seibel has on Wednesday April 3, 2013 inside the photo studio of the vintage clothing internet store headquarters in Pittsburgh. Seibel is wearing 'Your Lucky Daisy' dress, 'Hollywood Thrills' sunglasses and a 'Charter School' cardigan, all available at www.modcloth.com.
James Knox | Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
Modcloth stylist Emily Seibel models an outfit Wednesday April 3, 2013 inside the photo studio of the vintage clothing internet store headquarters in Pittsburgh. Seibel is wearing the 'Orla Kiely Trunnel of Love' dress and 'Doo Bee Doo Bee' shoes and carrying a 'Flying-HIgh' glass bag, all available at www.modcloth.com.
James Knox | Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
Modcloth stylists Nicole Czapinski (left) and Emily Seibel work to style an outfit that Seibel has on Wednesday April 3, 2013 inside the photo studio of the vintage clothing internet store headquarters in Pittsburgh. Seibel is wearing 'Your Lucky Daisy' dress, 'Hollywood Thrills' sunglasses and a 'Charter School' cardigan, all available at www.modcloth.com.
James Knox | Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
Modcloth stylists Nicole Czapinski (front) and Emily Seibel work to style an outfit that Seibel has on Wednesday April 3, 2013 inside the photo studio of the vintage clothing internet store headquarters in Pittsburgh. Seibel is wearing 'Your Lucky Daisy' dress, 'Hollywood Thrills' sunglasses and a 'Charter School' cardigan, all available at www.modcloth.com.
James Knox | Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
Modcloth stylists Chelsey Davidson (left) and Emily Seibel work to style an outfit that Seibel has on Wednesday April 3, 2013 inside the photo studio of the vintage clothing internet store headquarters in Pittsburgh. Seibel is wearing the 'Orla Kiely Trunnel of Love' dress and 'Doo Bee Doo Bee' shoes and carrying a 'Flying-HIgh' glass bag, all available at www.modcloth.com.

These are the clothes your grandmother and mother wore.

Or, at least, they will look like them.

Vintage-inspired apparel and accessories will be featured at the “60s Fashion Show: A Showcase of Yesterday's Styles & Today's Trends” at 7 p.m. April 12 at Senator John Heinz History Center in the Strip District.

Models sporting more than 100 looks will be walking the runway dressed in outfits from locally and nationally recognized retailers, including ModCloth, Hey Betty, Haute Vibe, Highway Robbery, TranquiliT Reclaimed Vintage and designer Lana Neumeyer.

A range of vintage styles will be on display from mod to boho-chic to the classic look recently popularized by the TV show “Mad Men.” Proceeds from the show benefit the museum's exhibits and educational programming.

The fashion show is part of Vintage Pittsburgh, a special two-day event April 12 and 13, held in conjunction with the museum's “1968: The Year That Rocked America” exhibit.

Stylists from www.modcloth.com held a recent fitting. The company known as a vintage-inspired retro e-boutique and headquartered here was happy to be involved says Aire Plichta, fashion press specialist for Modcloth, which will show 16 outfits. She says vintage clothing is inspiring.

“People really like the vintage, retro look,” says Chelsey Davidson, a lead ModCloth stylist. “They want to emulate fashion icons like Audrey Hepburn. It's a style that's trendy. Vintage also has very classic silhouettes.”

The fashion show is the perfect complement to the exhibit and the entire weekend of events, says Sarah Rooney, community programs manager for the history center.

All six floors of the museum will come alive with vintage clothing, classic cars, games, DJs and special guests from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. April 13. Events include a vendor fair for vintage fashion, house wares, vinyl, decor, artwork, accessories and collectibles as well as talks on how to care for and preserve vintage pieces. Actress Barbara Feldon, a Pittsburgh native, will discuss her role of “Agent 99” on the television show “Get Smart.” Visitors can take photos with “Herbie,” one of the original Volkswagen Beetles from the movie “The Love Bug.”

“This event is exciting for both the people who lived through the 1960s, as well as those who didn't,” Rooney says. “Seeing what was worn back then is fun. It kind of gives another view of what a traditional history museum is all about. And with the rebirth of vintage in the fashion world, it gives people a look at fashion that doesn't have to be the same cookie-cutter pieces because there are so many options.”

This is a great event for Pittsburgh, says Neumeyer.

“They asked me to showcase my vintage-inspired clothing,” says Neumeyer, from O'Hara. “I have lots of capes which I will show and other '60s-inspired pieces. I am very proud to have been asked to be a part of this show. I think it's a wonderful idea for a show, because vintage fashion is so popular and it's fun.”

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