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Fashion FYI: Hard Hats & High Heels

| Thursday, May 23, 2013, 8:55 p.m.
Dustin Yonish
The Hard Hats & High Heels Fashion Show is May 31 at the Doubletree by Hilton Hotel, Downtown. Models will wear merchandise from Macy’s as well as outfits made of material from the Habitat for Humanity ReStore designed by students from the Art Institute of Pittsburgh.
Dustin Yonish
Models at The Hard Hats & High Heels Fashion Show on May 31 will wear merchandise from Macy’s as well as outfits made of material from the Habitat for Humanity ReStore designed by students from the Art Institute of Pittsburgh.
LouisVuitton.com
A Louis Vuitton purse, like this Speedy 30 bag, will be featured at the third annual WISH-FM (99.7) Purse Party and Charity Auction on May 31, 2013.

The Hard Hats & High Heels Fashion Show is May 31 at the Doubletree by Hilton Hotel, Downtown. There is a VIP party at 6:30 p.m. followed by the 7:30 p.m. show, which will include models wearing merchandise from Macy's as well as outfits made of material from the Habitat for Humanity ReStore of Greater Pittsburgh and designed by students from the Art Institute of Pittsburgh. Proceeds benefit Habitat's Veterans Build Program. Tickets are $25; $100 for VIP. Details: hardhatshighheels.org

Purse party

The third-annual WISH-FM (99.7) Purse Party and Charity Auction is from 5:30 to 8 p.m. May 31 at the Sheraton Station Square Hotel, South Side. It will be a night filled with food, drink, entertainment and a luxury-purse auction of 100 handbags. Proceeds benefit the American Heart Association and Go Red for Women Pittsburgh. Admission is $15. Details: www.wshh.com or www.showclix.com

Tan time

With summer in sight, Allure magazine offers tips for applying self-tanner from Anna Stankiewicz of Suvara in New York City, who works with Jessica Simpson and model Miranda Kerr.

Preparing your skin for self-tanner is just as important as the application itself.

Do everything else first: If you need to wax, shave, get your nails done or touch up your hair color, get that taken care of beforehand. All of those treatments can remove self-tanner.

Scrub and soften: Dry skin drinks up self-tanner, resulting in dark patches. That's why it's essential to exfoliate from head to toe, focusing on rough areas like the knees, elbows, ankles and heels. Avoid oil-based body scrubs, which leave behind a residue that causes streaks.

After showering: Dry off and wait 10 minutes or until you are completely dry.

Dab a little body lotion: Rub it on your knees, elbows and ankles to keep them from turning dark or orange.

Pick your potion: Mousses are the easiest to rub in, but sprays are great for hard-to-reach areas. L'Oreal Sublime Bronze ProPerfect Salon Airbrush Self-Tanning Mist sprays in any direction. Pick a light-to-medium formula if you have fair skin and a dark formula for olive tones.

Start at the bottom and work up: This way, you won't get any weird marks when you bend over. Save your arms for last.

Take time, and powder: Give yourself extra time to dry. If the directions say five minutes, wait 10. Then, brush a talc-free baby powder all over. It stops the tanner from transferring to your clothes.

Style-setter

Heart of Dixie actress Jamie King has an eye-catching style that's fresh, daring and totally of-the-moment. Try her suggestions in People Style Watch:

Create a modern mix: Bold prints, leather and vintage tees amp up pencil skirts and flowy dresses. “I love adding eclectic elements to more-classic styles,” she says.

Work on-trend extras: Silver pumps and statement jewelry up the wow factor. “Most of my outfits are inspired by accessories,” she says. “I choose a piece and build from there.”

Don't go too bare: She offsets revealing pieces, like a crop-top or shorts, with more-conservative ones. “It's about balance,” she says. “Plus, mystery can be very sexy.”

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