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Hall and Jagger play model mom, daughter

| Friday, May 10, 2013, 8:09 p.m.

Like mother, like daughter. And Jerry Hall and Georgia May Jagger do seem to like each other quite a bit.

Together, they enjoy riding horses, spa days, gardening, cooking and reading the Sunday newspaper, especially their horoscopes. They share clothes now, too, and are starring in a campaign for Sunglass Hut, their first major joint modeling gig.

The key to the closeness between Hall, 56, and Jagger, 21? “Mom's always right,” Jagger says dutifully — and with a laugh.

However, Hall says she is increasingly taking advice, especially when it comes to fashion and style, from Jagger, who has modeled for H&M and Madonna's Material Girl line.

Hall and Jagger are reunited temporarily under the same London roof. Jagger is doing some home renovations, so she moved in with Mom.

They were together in New York for a promotional event for Sunglass Hut.

Their opinions differ when asked who is recognized more often on the street. Jagger says Hall, Hall says Jagger. “It seems like she's on TV every five minutes in England.”

Hall, a Texas native, was a rising modeling industry star in the late 1970s when she met — and later married and divorced — Mick Jagger. She's broadened her career to include some acting, including several stage productions of “The Graduate,” including an upcoming Australian version, as seductress Mrs. Robinson.

Jagger says she goes to her mother for career advice. “She always says, ‘Have fun, but take it seriously.' And then she says, ‘Be on time.'”

Samantha Critchell is the AP fashion writer.

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