Share This Page

This fall is the time to get excited about new pants

| Sunday, Sept. 1, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

Pants are always popular, especially with real women and real lives to lead, but they rarely spark a lot of excitement. What can you do with two legs and a waistband, after all?

More than you think, responds the fashion industry this fall.

“Pants feed back into the overarching idea of personal style,” says Samira Nasr, fashion director at Elle magazine. “There really is a choice in how adventurous do you want to be.”

She adds: “Pants are the go-to because they are the most comfortable thing, they look good and they are a functional garment. Women can go about their day and feel ‘dressed.' ”

Still, can you get the compliments with pants that you always seem to receive when you wear a new dress?

Absolutely, says designer Nanette Lepore: Find your fit and a good tailor, and the kind words will come.

A teenager or even a young 20-something who probably mostly wears jeans or shorts has never really lived through a high-fashion pants moment, she says. This is her chance.

She can break away from leggings or skinny jeans — or at least try them in prints — and she should try the relaxed track-pant silhouette that has broken out as a trend, says Lepore, who designs a youthful line for JCPenney called L'Amour. “It's going to be a little bit of a leap for her, but she's going to get the coolness of them.”

“I have them on today,” Lepore said. “I wear them with a nice peasant top — I decided to mix it with something soft and feminine — but most girls will wear it with a simple T-shirt. But I wanted to move it to a new place if we're going to make it our new go-to pant.”

For a more sophisticated customer, she'd recommend clean, slim-leg trousers paired with a tailored suit jacket. “I really think the suit could be the new dress.”

And Lepore says higher waistbands are on the way.

As for the wide-leg option, it's out there, especially a cropped style that landed on Nasr's radar after previews of the resort collections that will be available around the holidays.

Lepore says women “just love skinny pants. ... I don't see a flared leg coming back anytime soon.”

The jumpsuit, however, is ripe for a return, says designer Abi Ferrin, who spent three years retooling the silhouette to create one she thought would work for her own more curvy shape.

Her newest twist for fall is a jumpsuit with the genie-style, cinched-bottom ankle.

But trying on pants is something many women dread, says Devina Foley, vice president of merchandising at retailer Loft. She's been dubbed “the pants whisperer” inside the company as she has worked with chief style director Alia Ahmed-Yahia to overhaul the design, fit and overall shopping experience for pants.

The last time pants were a must-have for the important fall shopping season was about five years ago, and there has been improvement in fabric technology since then.

There are good options with some wool and some cotton — but all with stretch — that will allow for some drape but still have a smoothing effect, Foley says.

At Loft, the waistband also has become a little wider to create the look of a flatter middle, and the side seam down the leg has been moved forward slightly so the front looks slimmer.

When shoppers find a pant they like, they buy multiples, she says, which they don't do when it's a dress or a skirt.

“You remember where you got your favorite pair of pants,” Nasr says.

Samantha Critchell is an AP fashion writer.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.