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Everyone's crazy about a sharp-dressed man — at Pittsburgh Fashion Week

| Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2013, 10:03 p.m.
Jasmine Goldband | Tribune-Review
Back stage before the “Rediscover ManStyle” Fashion Show at the Pittsburgh Winery in the Strip District.
Jasmine Goldband | Tribune-Review
Back stage before the “Rediscover ManStyle” Fashion Show at the Pittsburgh Winery in the Strip District.
Jasmine Goldband | Tribune-Review
Savoy executive chef Kevin Watson walks in the “Rediscover ManStyle” Fashion Show at the Pittsburgh Winery in the Strip District.
Jasmine Goldband | Tribune-Review
A model shows off his look in the “Rediscover ManStyle” Fashion Show at the Pittsburgh Winery in the Strip District.
Jasmine Goldband | Tribune-Review
Models show off fashions in the “Rediscover ManStyle” Fashion Show at the Pittsburgh Winery in the Strip District.
Jasmine Goldband | Tribune-Review
Savoy executive chef Kevin Watson waits to walk in the “Rediscover ManStyle” Fashion Show at the Pittsburgh Winery in the Strip District.
Jasmine Goldband | Tribune-Review
A model shows off his look in the “Rediscover ManStyle” Fashion Show at the Pittsburgh Winery in the Strip District.
Jasmine Goldband | Tribune-Review
A model shows off his look in the “Rediscover ManStyle” Fashion Show at the Pittsburgh Winery in the Strip District.
Jasmine Goldband | Tribune-Review
A model shows off his look in the “Rediscover ManStyle” Fashion Show at the Pittsburgh Winery in the Strip District.
Jasmine Goldband | Tribune-Review
A model shows off his look in the “Rediscover ManStyle” Fashion Show at the Pittsburgh Winery in the Strip District.
Jasmine Goldband | Tribune-Review
A model shows off his look in the “Rediscover ManStyle” Fashion Show at the Pittsburgh Winery in the Strip District.
Jasmine Goldband | Tribune-Review
Pittsburgh fashion week executive director and founder Miyoshi Anderson closes the “Rediscover ManStyle” Fashion Show at the Pittsburgh Winery in the Strip District.

The sharp-dressed men were in the spotlight on this runway.

It was guys' night at the fourth annual Pittsburgh Fashion Week. Models were invited to express their individual style through wearing their own clothing at the “Rediscover ManStyle” Fashion Show on Sept. 24 at The Pittsburgh Winery in the Strip District.

LaMont Jones, a former Pittsburgh Fashion Hall of Famer, introduced 15 men, who showcased style they found in their own closets.

Fashion Week executive director Miyoshi Anderson gave a title to each guy's style — athletic chic, high urban fashion and classic corporate. They wore everything from leather to camouflage pants to a two-piece suit.

Styles included military-inspired looks, splashes of color, neon shoelaces and bold shorts – from edgy to classic.

“This was a great setting, and I felt that more of an intimate setting would allow the guests to really see the models and see their clothing,” Anderson said. “It was an opportunity for the audience to connect with the models. With this being our third year for the men's show, I really believe that the men's show is a very important part of Pittsburgh Fashion Week. I wanted to include the men because they love fashion and have fun ways to express their style. Having the celebrity models just topped off the entire evening.”

Celebrity models included WPXI-TV news anchor Vince Sims and executive chef Kevin Watson from Savoy in the Strip District. They modeled suits from Macy's.

Before exiting the runway, Sims stopped and pulled up his pant leg to reveal a pink sock.

“I really love fashion and I love to add a little bit of flair to an outfit,” he said. “For the news, I need to be a little more conservative, but I can add a fun pair of socks or a fun tie to add in my personal style.”

This was Fashion Week's first show at the winery. Owner Tim Gaber said the intimate setting and that worked perfectly for the men's show.

“The guys were more comfortable wearing their own clothes and not having to walk down such a long runway,” he said. “It worked perfectly. I think the cozy atmosphere was the right setting for this type of fashion show.

“It is great that Pittsburgh has its own fashion week,” he said.

“Menswear is so important,” said Anderson. “We women like our men to look good. This night was also important because it not only showcased the men of Pittsburgh and their individual styles but it also helped other men who may be down on their luck. It is important to give back and Pittsburgh Fashion Week is committed to doing just that.”

Watson said he had a blast.

“It was really fun,” said Watson, who rocked a Calvin Klein suit and orange shirt and tie with a pocket square with orange polka dots. “I enjoyed seeing all the young guys show their great styles. Fashion is like food, you wear what you like and you eat what you like. Everyone has their own swag. There were some things I could not wear but they looked great in it because it is their style. There was great energy in that room.”

Proceeds from the event benefited Capacity Developers, a non-profit organization that provides service and support to help individuals and families realize economic stability, self-reliance and well being.

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