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Are turtlenecks back for men? Or did they never go away?

| Thursday, Oct. 31, 2013, 8:55 p.m.

The turtleneck sweater got a little love in recent Wall Street Journal's style pages, which proclaimed that there are “more ways than ever” for men to wear the knit alternative to a shirt-and-tie.

But there are some pros and cons.

Pro: The high neck style “elongates you — it makes your chest all the way to your jawline one continuous look. And it slenderizes the face.”

Con: Beware letting the sweater encounter a five o'clock shadow. “It'll pick and pill it.”

The haberdashers in the luxe confines of Heimie's Haberdashery in downtown St. Paul, Minn., aren't quite ready to commit to turtlenecks being a hot fashion statement.

“But I can tell you this much, we have quite a few men still looking for the turtle,” said Gus Gonzales. “I don't think it's ever gone away. Every gentleman should probably have a turtleneck in his closet.”

Gonzales said turtlenecks are best worn with sports coats and blazers for a casual look, “although I'm also seeing a nice black suit, with a nice heathered gray, lightweight merino turtleneck.”

Oh yeah.

For the record, Gonzalez said that a proper turtleneck sweater has a collar that extends all the way up a man's neck and then folds over. A mock turtleneck is a single thickness, lacking the fold.

Is it a fashion faux pas to add that they're also warm?

Kim Ode is a staff writer for the Star Tribune (Minneapolis).

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