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Try this side dish with an Asian flair

| Saturday, Nov. 4, 2017, 9:00 p.m.
Roasted Cauliflower with Sesame Drizzle
Roasted Cauliflower with Sesame Drizzle

Food writers (and I include myself) are often talking about what new things you can do with that package of chicken breasts or that pound of ground beef to get out of the same-old, same-old cooking rut. But we might not spend enough time talking about what to do with that head of cauliflower or broccoli. We can all feel as uninspired looking at those stoic spheres as we do with our proteins, right?

So off we go, on the hunt for a new and simple side dish. This is definitely one to keep in mind when you're making a stir fry or other Asian-influenced dish. It's especially useful since you can make the drizzle ahead of time, pop the vegetable in the oven, and get to work at the stove making the rest of the meal. The cauliflower or broccoli needs no attention as it roasts, only the sound of the buzzer to remind you to take it out of the oven.

Cauliflower with Sesame Drizzle

Start to finish: 30 to 35 minutes

Serves 4

1 large (1 34 pound) head cauliflower (or substitute the same amount of broccoli heads)

2 tablespoons olive oil

Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

2 tablespoons untoasted sesame seeds (optional)

Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

2 tablespoons soy sauce

1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil

1 teaspoon honey

1 teaspoon Sriracha sauce

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Cut the cauliflower into florets. Place the cauliflower on a rimmed baking sheet and drizzle with the olive oil. Toss well, and then sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast for about 25 minutes, until crisp-tender and browned at the edges.

Meanwhile, if you are using the sesame seeds, heat a skillet over medium heat. Add the sesame seeds and stir frequently for about 1 or 2 minutes, until they start to become golden; don't let them get too brown. Transfer them to a plate.

In a small bowl, combine the soy sauce, sesame oil, honey and Sriracha sauce. When the cauliflower is roasted, transfer it to a serving platter and drizzle the sauce over it (or pass the sauce on the side for everyone to drizzle over their own portion). Sprinkle the top with sesame seeds, if desired, and serve hot or warm.

Nutrition information per serving: 145 calories; 87 calories from fat; 10 g fat (1 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 0 mg cholesterol; 490 mg sodium; 12 g carbohydrate; 4 g fiber; 6 g sugar; 5 g protein.

Katie Workman has written two cookbooks focused on easy, family-friendly cooking, “Dinner Solved!” and “The Mom 100 Cookbook.”

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