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Standing Rib Roast a feast for any occasion

| Saturday, Dec. 8, 2012, 9:00 p.m.
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Standing Rib Roast With Horseradish Cream and Cabernet Sauce

Many people think of prime rib as a restaurant specialty, but the truth is, it's pretty easy for the home cook to make. It's easy to get confused with the term “standing rib roast,” but if you look for prime rib, you will be safe. Keep in mind that it doesn't necessarily mean the meat is prime grade. The word “prime” by itself only describes the most-desirable part of the “rib section” of the beef, regardless of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Grade. Look for prime or choice grade for the best texture and flavor.

Diane Rossen Worthington is the author of 20 cookbooks, and also a James Beard award-winning radio-show host.

Standing Rib Roast With Horseradish Cream and Cabernet Sauce

For the horseradish cream:

13 cup prepared cream-style horseradish

1 cup sour cream

1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice

Salt and freshly ground white pepper, to taste

For the seasoning paste:

1 tablespoon Seriously Simple Seasoning Salt or other seasoning salt

14 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1 teaspoon dry mustard

2 tablespoons flour

1 tablespoon olive oil

For the roast:

One 3-rib standing-rib roast, 6 to 8 pounds, chine bone removed

1 12 cups water, divided

1 cup cabernet sauvignon

1 cup veal stock or beef broth

Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

To prepare the horseradish cream: In a small bowl, stir together all of the ingredients until well blended. Taste and adjust the seasonings. Transfer to a serving bowl, cover and refrigerate.

To prepare the seasoning paste: In a small bowl, stir together all of the ingredients until well blended.

To prepare the horseradish cream: In a small bowl, stir together all of the ingredients until well blended. Taste and adjust the seasonings. Transfer to a serving bowl, cover and refrigerate.

To prepare the seasoning paste: In a small bowl, stir together all of the ingredients until well blended.

To prepare the roast: Heat the oven to 450 degrees. Place a roasting rack in a large roasting pan. Set the rib roast on the rack, fat side up. Using your hands, carefully pat a thin coating of seasoning paste on the top and sides of the roast. Let stand for 30 minutes. Pour 12 cup of the water in the pan to help keep the pan from burning. Place the roast in the oven and roast for 20 minutes. Reduce the oven temperature to 350 degrees and roast for 1 to 1 12hours, or until an instant-read thermometer inserted in the center of the roast away from the bone reads 125 degrees for medium-rare. After 30 minutes, add another 12 cup of water to keep the pan from burning and add the remaining 1 cup water after another 30 minutes. Start checking for doneness after the roast has cooked for 1 hour to make sure you don't overcook it. Transfer the roast to a carving board. Loosely cover with aluminum foil and let rest for at least 20 minutes. Remove the rack from the roasting pan. Place the roasting pan on top of the stove. Skim off most of the fat and add the wine. Turn on the heat to medium-high and reduce the wine until it has thickened, scraping up any brown bits. Add the stock and cook until the sauce is slightly thickened. Season with salt and pepper. Pour into a gravy boat. Carve the roast as you prefer. Serve the horseradish cream and the cabernet sauce on the side.

Advance preparation: Make the horseradish sauce up to 4 hours ahead, cover, and refrigerate. Make the seasoning paste up to 4 hours ahead, cover, and keep at room temperature.

Serves 8.

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