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Carrot cake: Unadorned is best way to enjoy spring fav

| Tuesday, April 23, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
Emma Christensen
Carrot Sheet Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting.

I have an aunt who is famous in the family for her carrot cake. This is partly due to the fact that she doesn't make it for just any old dinner or family gathering. It just magically shows up exactly when you need it. And with its tender cinnamon-scented crumb and thick layer of cream cheese frosting, yes, you definitely need it.

Far from guarding her secret, my aunt happily shared the recipe with me a while back when I asked for it. She admitted that she originally copied the recipe from a cookbook, though she had forgotten exactly which one. But she then went on to describe so many tweaks, adjustments and variations that I'm convinced this is now solely her own.

In turn, I have made my own tweaks and adjustments. My aunt prefers a layered round cake; I like a sheet cake.

My aunt adds nuts and raisins; I'll make mine with the carrots alone. My aunt uses a cooked frosting of cream, sugar and cream cheese; I keep it simple with a basic cream cheese frosting.

But the base recipe remains my aunt's, and it surpasses all other carrot cakes I've ever had the pleasure of sampling.

Emma Christensen is recipe editor at TheKitchn.com.

Carrot Sheet Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting

This recipe is adapted from a recipe by my Kitchn colleague Faith Durand.

Butter

Oil, or nonstick cooking spray

2 cups (10 ounces) flour

2 teaspoons cinnamon

2 teaspoons baking powder

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon salt

4 eggs, room temperature

1 teaspoon vanilla

34 cup canola oil

1 cup granulated sugar

4 cups grated carrots (a little less than 2 pounds of whole carrots)

1 batch Cream Cheese Frosting (see recipe)

For the Cream Cheese Frosting:

14 cup unsalted butter, room temperature

1 package (8-ounces) cream cheese, at room temperature

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

3 cups confectioner's sugar

Pinch of salt

Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 9-inch by 13-inch baking dish.

Whisk together the flour, cinnamon, baking powder, baking soda and salt. In a separate bowl, beat the eggs with the vanilla. Set both aside.

In a large bowl, beat together the oil and sugar in a mixer or by hand until they reach a uniform consistency.

With the mixer on low, beat in 13 of the flour. Next, add 12 of the eggs. Continue adding the flour and eggs in alternating additions. Stop mixing when the last of the flour is just barely incorporated. Fold the carrots into the batter with a spatula, working slowly and gently until the carrots are distributed and no more dry flour remains.

Pour the batter into the baking dish and tap the dish a few times against the counter to work out the air bubbles. Bake for 45 to 50 minutes, rotating once during baking. The finished cake should be slightly puffed in the middle and browned on the edges. A toothpick inserted in the middle should come out clean.

Let the cake cool completely before frosting, for about one hour, or wait to frost until the next day. Leftover cake can be kept, covered, at room temperature for several days. You can also wrap the unfrosted cake in aluminum foil and freeze it for up to 3 months.

Makes 12 to 15 servings, depending on the size of your pieces.

To prepare the Cream Cheese Frosting: Beat together the butter and cream cheese. Slowly beat in the vanilla, confectioner's sugar and salt. Increase to high speed once the frosting starts to come together into lumps. Beat until creamy, scraping down the sides of the bowl as necessary.

Makes enough to thickly cover a 9- by 13-inch cake.

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