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Pittsburgh's Schwartz's is reborn as a Living Market on the South Side

STEPHANIE STRASBURG /TRIBUNE-REVIEW - 'We're linking the urban and suburban 'Food Not Lawns' movement with the urban core and our inner core, our inner health,' says Elisa Haransky-Beck, of Monroeville, of transforming the South Side's Schwartz's Market, which was once a mainstay grocery, into a food and art market. Mr. Beck's grandparents were Morris and Helen Schwartz, who moved their business to this same space along East Carson Street in the South Side in 1938. 'Between the bars, that tattoo parlors, and at the massage parlors, we're right in the middle of it all,' says Haransky-Beck of creating a space for healthy living in the middle of the existing Carson Street culture.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>STEPHANIE STRASBURG /TRIBUNE-REVIEW</em></div>'We're linking the urban and suburban 'Food Not Lawns' movement with the urban core and our inner core, our inner health,' says Elisa Haransky-Beck, of Monroeville, of transforming the South Side's Schwartz's Market, which was once a mainstay grocery, into a food and art market. Mr. Beck's grandparents were Morris and Helen Schwartz, who moved their business to this same space along East Carson Street in the South Side in 1938. 'Between the bars, that tattoo parlors, and at the massage parlors, we're right in the middle of it all,' says Haransky-Beck of creating a space for healthy living in the middle of the existing Carson Street culture.
STEPHANIE STRASBURG | TRIBUNE-REVIEW - 'We're linking the urban and suburban 'Food Not Lawns' movement with the urban core and our inner core, our inner health,' says Elisa Haransky-Beck, of Monroeville, of transforming the old Schwartz's Market, South Side. Haransky-Beck, seen here sitting on a bench with her husband, Stan Beck.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>STEPHANIE STRASBURG | TRIBUNE-REVIEW</em></div>'We're linking the urban and suburban 'Food Not Lawns' movement with the urban core and our inner core, our inner health,' says Elisa Haransky-Beck, of Monroeville, of transforming the old Schwartz's Market, South Side. Haransky-Beck, seen here sitting on a bench with her husband, Stan Beck.
- 'When people ask what we're doing, I tell people, what do you want to be doing? How do you want to engage?' says Elisa Haransky-Beck, of Monroeville, on the collaborative mission of Schwartz Living Market along Carson Street in the South Side. Volunteers and entrepreneurs talk inside the storefront about plans for what will be coming to the South Side storefront, including a space for Haransky-Beck's visual therapy, Green Mango Thai Cafe, a juice bar, and arts vendors, among other things.
'When people ask what we're doing, I tell people, what do you want to be doing? How do you want to engage?' says Elisa Haransky-Beck, of Monroeville, on the collaborative mission of Schwartz Living Market along Carson Street in the South Side. Volunteers and entrepreneurs talk inside the storefront about plans for what will be coming to the South Side storefront, including a space for Haransky-Beck's visual therapy, Green Mango Thai Cafe, a juice bar, and arts vendors, among other things.
STEPHANIE STRASBURG /TRIBUNE-REVIEW - Elisa Haransky-Beck, of Monroeville, holds a tray of bean sprouts her husband has been growing as she talks in the Schwartz Living Market along East Carson Street in the South Side on Tuesday, June 17, 2013. Haransky-Beck is helping to convert the space, which was previously a grocer started by her husband's grandparents, into a food and art market, a living space, and a living building, referring to the principles of Transition Towns and permaculture.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>STEPHANIE STRASBURG /TRIBUNE-REVIEW</em></div>Elisa Haransky-Beck, of Monroeville, holds a tray of bean sprouts her husband has been growing as she talks in the Schwartz Living Market along East Carson Street in the South Side on Tuesday, June 17, 2013. Haransky-Beck is helping to convert the space, which was previously a grocer started by her husband's grandparents, into a food and art market, a living space, and a living building, referring to the principles of Transition Towns and permaculture.
STEPHANIE STRASBURG /TRIBUNE-REVIEW - Elisa Haransky-Beck (right), of Monroeville, leads Schwartz Living Market interior designer Lauren DeKleva, 30, of Highland Park, in an exercise to strengthen her vision as they talk about what will be coming to the South Side storefront, including a space for Haransky-Beck's visual therapy, a Green Mango Thai Cafe, juice bar, and arts vendors, among other things. 'When people ask what we're doing, I tell people, what do you want to be doing? How do you want to engage?' says Haransky-Beck on the collaborative intentions of the space.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>STEPHANIE STRASBURG /TRIBUNE-REVIEW</em></div>Elisa Haransky-Beck (right), of Monroeville, leads Schwartz Living Market interior designer Lauren DeKleva, 30, of Highland Park, in an exercise to strengthen her vision as they talk about what will be coming to the South Side storefront, including a space for Haransky-Beck's visual therapy, a Green Mango Thai Cafe, juice bar, and arts vendors, among other things. 'When people ask what we're doing, I tell people, what do you want to be doing? How do you want to engage?' says Haransky-Beck on the collaborative intentions of the space.
STEPHANIE STRASBURG /TRIBUNE-REVIEW - From left to right, Stan Beck, Elisa Haransky-Beck, Rachel Beck, 17, and Laura Beck, 21, all of Monroeville, pose for a portrait outside of Schwartz Living Market in the South Side on Tuesday, June 17, 2013. Mr. Beck's grandparents were Morris and Helen Schwartz, who moved their business to this same space along East Carson Street in the South Side in 1938 after operating down the street since the early 1900's. The family and other volunteers and entrepreneurs are now transforming the storefront into a collaborative living market, and the building has been registered with the Living Building Challenge since 2010.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>STEPHANIE STRASBURG /TRIBUNE-REVIEW</em></div>From left to right, Stan Beck, Elisa Haransky-Beck, Rachel Beck, 17, and Laura Beck, 21, all of Monroeville, pose for a portrait outside of Schwartz  Living Market in the South Side on Tuesday, June 17, 2013. Mr. Beck's grandparents were Morris and Helen Schwartz, who moved their business to this same space along East Carson Street in the South Side in 1938 after operating down the street since the early 1900's. The family and other volunteers and entrepreneurs are now transforming the storefront into a collaborative living market, and the building has been registered with the Living Building Challenge since 2010.
STEPHANIE STRASBURG /TRIBUNE-REVIEW - Elisa Haransky-Beck, of Monroeville, poses on a trampoline that she utilizes in her practice as a vision therapist outside of the Schwartz Living Market along East Carson Street in the South Side on Tuesday, June 17, 2013. Haransky-Beck is helping to convert the space, which was previously a grocer started by her husband's grandparents, into a food and art market, a living space, and a living building, referring to the principles of Transition Towns and permaculture. Plans include permaculture production on the roof, a venue for locally sourced food, and a morphing, flexible space for vendors and community members that want to be involved.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>STEPHANIE STRASBURG /TRIBUNE-REVIEW</em></div>Elisa Haransky-Beck, of Monroeville, poses on a trampoline that she utilizes in her practice as a vision therapist outside of the Schwartz Living Market along East Carson Street in the South Side on Tuesday, June 17, 2013. Haransky-Beck is helping to convert the space, which was previously a grocer started by her husband's grandparents, into a food and art market, a living space, and a living building, referring to the principles of Transition Towns and permaculture. Plans include permaculture production on the roof, a venue for locally sourced food, and a morphing, flexible space for vendors and community members that want to be involved.

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By Sam Spatter
Tuesday, June 18, 2013, 7:30 p.m.
 

Schwartz's Market, which closed last year after an 84-year run, will begin its rebirth June 21 as Schwartz Living Market.

While the official ribbon-cutting ceremony happens at 2 p.m., the festivities that begin at 11 a.m. June 21 kick off a three-day celebration at 1317 E. Carson St., South Side, under the guidance of Elisa Beck, who, with her husband, Stanley, owns the building.

At about 1:45 p.m. June 21, some of the 25 venders who will regularly stock the market will perform at the five windows in the building for about five minutes, Beck says.

The Living Market won't be the same type of market, as its new name implies.

“We're so excited,” Beck says. “Where else can you go shopping for real food and great arts, see wonderful educational films, obtain living juices, learn about sprouting and growing seeds, tour an amazing historic building, and quiz business owners.”

In addition to natural-food products from local farms, the market will feature local arts, educational movies and specialties such as living juices, including wheat grass juice, and providing instructions on sprouting and growing seeds.

Other attractions include a Vision Gym, a hand-powered generator that shows visitors how much energy it takes to light a light bulb, a trampoline, an earth plaster demonstration on stilts, a Native American craftsman creating his craft, and a beekeeper to instruct about honey. Vibroacoustic Harp Therapy and hula hooping add to the package.

There will be venders offering Gryphon's Tea, bakery items, S'Echairer and coffee, among other food products.

On hand June 21 will be Darrell Frey, author of “Bioshelter Market Garden: A Permaculture Farm.” who will autograph his book. Janet Mckee, a holistic health educator, will be on hand, along with Tamar George, who will provide readings.

Staggered throughout the three days will be music and dance performances.

Not all of the 25 venders will be present each day, Beck says. They will rent tables inside the market to display their products for $25 per day. Various events are scheduled during the three-day opening celebration period, including daily market tours starting at 3 p.m. A movie will be shown at 1 p.m. each of the three days.

The hours of the festivities are from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 21 to 23.

The market's normal hours will be from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturdays through Labor Day, when additional days and hours will be added, Beck says.

Sam Spatter is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-320-7843 or sspatter@tribweb.com.

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