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Three peppers add pop to July Fourth potato salad

| Saturday, June 22, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

One variety of pepper just isn't enough to get this potato salad ready for your July Fourth celebration. So, we upped it to three — black pepper, cayenne pepper and roasted red peppers — each adding their own distinct flavor. And don't worry, the bite of black and cayenne peppers are tamed by the sweet roasted red peppers and the sour cream dressing.

Want to add fourth and fifth varieties? Mix in some diced mild Peppadew peppers (tangy, but not much heat) and banana peppers (sweet and crunchy). For a crunchy contrast, you even could add a sixth with a diced, fresh green bell pepper.

Alison Ladman is a recipe developer for the Associated Press.

Three-Pepper Barbecue Potato Salad

Start to finish: 1 hour (15 minutes active)

2 pounds red potatoes, cubed

1 tablespoon cider vinegar

12 cup sour cream

12 cup barbecue sauce

1 teaspoon chile powder

12 teaspoon garlic powder

12 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

14 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste

12-ounce jar roasted red peppers, drained, patted dry and chopped

4 green onions, chopped

1 cup shredded sharp cheddar cheese

Salt, to taste

Place the potatoes in a large pot and add enough water to cover them by 1 inch. Bring them to a boil and cook until the potatoes are just tender, for about 15 to 20 minutes. Drain the potatoes, then spread them on a rimmed baking sheet to cool. Sprinkle the cooling potatoes with the vinegar, then refrigerate for 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, in a large bowl, combine the sour cream, barbecue sauce, chile powder, garlic powder, black pepper and cayenne pepper. Stir in the roasted red peppers, green onion and cheddar.

When the potatoes are cool, gently stir them into the sour cream mixture until well-coated. Season with salt. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

Makes 8 servings.

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