TribLIVE

| Lifestyles


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Ways to get creative with leftover doughnuts (as if)

By The Washington Post
Saturday, July 13, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
 

After tasting so many doughnuts, we spotted a few patterns, and we learned what's crucial to positive outcomes. Herewith, our Ten Commandments of Doughnuts for those who make and sell them:

Fresh is best. (And warm is a bonus, of course. We appreciated the places that cooked to order.) If you still have doughnuts unsold at the end of the day, give them away or use them to make new desserts, such as bread puddings and other confections.

Keep the oil clean and replace it often. Nothing kills the flavor of an otherwise nicely fried, glazed doughnut quicker than rancid oil or, heaven forbid, oil that tastes of other, non-doughnut items.

Grease, though, isn't the word. Or, it shouldn't be when describing a doughnut. That means you must keep the oil hot enough for proper frying, and you must properly drain the thing. A little bit of oil on our fingertips, mouths and/or napkins is expected; a lot is off-putting.

Timing, obviously, is crucial. Make sure you're neither undercooking (leaving a gummy texture) nor overcooking (drying out).

Cake vs. yeasted? Our panel had its biases, reinforced by so many bakeries' decision to use the same packaged cake doughnut mix. If you're going to offer both kinds of doughnuts, don't whiff on the dense side.

Learn to walk before you run. Perfect a simple doughnut before you start getting fancy. The more intricate and involved your flavor combinations, the more room for error.

Use high-quality ingredients. We can taste the difference. That might apply to toppings and fillings even more than to the dough itself. Give us real chocolate — real, deep, dark chocolate — and we'll love you for it. Make jam filling from real fruit and sugar, not the contents of a Sysco-delivered vacuum pack. If you're going to use maple, make it the actual stuff that was once in a tree. (You do know that's where maple syrup comes from, right?) Pastry creams and custards are simple to make from scratch, and they elevate a doughnut immeasurably.

Speaking of filling ... Make sure there's enough in there, and distribute it evenly.

Size matters. A doughnut that is richly filled and/or topped can be a tad smaller. Consumers will appreciate it — and maybe even buy two, for sharing. The novelty of going big can work, as long as it's well executed. And don't cede the doughnut-hole operation to the double D folks; the holes can be a vehicle for test-driving new flavors.

Don't forget eye appeal. We don't need every doughnut to look fanciful, but it should be decorated — or, at least, glazed — with care. And don't think your work stops once you finish making the doughnuts. The more involved your toppings, the more carefully you need to box up those doughnuts so they arrive at their destination looking close to as good as when they left your shop. Two previously beautiful doughnuts can look like road kill when mashed up against each other in a hastily packed container.

Leftover doughnuts

Leftover doughnuts — if there is such a thing in your world — do not have to wind up smooshed into a casserole with eggs, cream and butter. Not that there's anything wrong with that as an occasional splurge.

Bayou Bakery chef-owner David Guas turns beignet dough scraps into sticky buns with a bourbon-pecan glaze. The beignet dough recipe comes from his 2009 cookbook, “DamGoodSweet.”

Tiffany MacIsaac, executive pastry chef of the Neighborhood Restaurant Group, offered a couple of smart solutions:

Doughnut crisps. These are easy to do, akin to baked bagel chips. The difference is that doughnut crisps tend to stay a little softer at the center, and their glazed edges caramelize just enough to provide a sweet crunch.

Use a serrated knife to cut day-old glazed, unfilled doughnuts. When you cut them in half vertically and then into thin slices, the yield will be about 16 slices. Cut horizontally, and you might get 4 round slices. Spread them on a rimmed baking sheet and bake at 275 degrees for 10 minutes, then turn them over and bake for another 5 minutes or so. Eat them warm, or cool and store them in an airtight container.

Doughnut truffles. They could be mistaken for cake pops that are surprisingly less sweet. MacIsaac developed two no-bake, chocolate-coated recipes using day-old plain or glazed cake doughnuts: Nutella and one that incorporates blueberry jam, lime and fresh ginger.

Nutella Doughnut Truffles

Use day-old plain or glazed cake doughnuts to make these no-bake, cake-pop-like treats.

The coated truffles can be refrigerated for up to 3 days. The chocolate surface might sweat a bit once it's thoroughly chilled. From Tiffany MacIsaac, executive pastry chef of the Neighborhood Restaurant Group.

3 to 4 glazed or plain chocolate cake doughnuts (about 7 ounces total)

2 pinches kosher salt

13 cup Nutella

13 cup skinned, toasted and chopped hazelnuts, plus more for optional garnish ( see note)

8 ounces good-quality dark chocolate, broken into pieces (preferably at least 70 percent)

12 teaspoon vegetable shortening

Flaked sea salt, for optional garnish

Tear or crumble the doughnuts into penny-size pieces until you have about 312 cups, letting them fall into a mixing bowl as you work. Season with the 2 pinches of salt, then gently stir in the Nutella in tablespoon increments along with the 13 cup of nuts, being careful not to break up the doughnut pieces too much.

Divide the mixture into 9 or 10 equal portions and roll into compact balls. Return them to the bowl and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes or until somewhat firm.

Meanwhile, combine the chocolate and shortening in a microwave-safe bowl. Heat on low in 20-second increments until melted, stirring after each one. Once the mixture is smooth, cool slightly. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and set a wire cooling rack over it.

Working with one chilled doughnut ball at a time, dip the balls into the chocolate mixture to coat. While they are still wet, sprinkle each one with a few flakes of the sea salt and a few pieces of toasted hazelnut, if desired. Place on the wire rack until completely set, then transfer to an airtight container and refrigerate until ready to serve.

Note: Toast skinned hazelnuts in a small, dry skillet over medium-low heat until lightly browned and fragrant, shaking the pan to avoid scorching. Cool completely before using.

Makes 9 or 10 truffles.

Nutrition per piece (based on 10): 290 calories, 20 grams fat (8 grams saturate), 0 cholesterol, 3 grams protein, 25 grams carbohydrates, 3 grams dietary fiber, 170 milligrams sodium

Blueberry-Lime Doughnut Truffles

Use day-old plain or glazed cake doughnuts to make these cake-pop-like treats. Feel free to substitute your favorite jam flavor, such as strawberry, peach, apricot or sour cherry.

The coated truffles can be refrigerated for up to 3 days. The chocolate surface might sweat a bit once it's thoroughly chilled. From Tiffany MacIsaac, executive pastry chef of the Neighborhood Restaurant Group.

3 to 4 glazed or plain vanilla cake doughnuts (about 634 ounces total)

3 tablespoons finely chopped crystallized ginger, plus more for garnish

Pinch kosher salt

Grated zest (no pith) of 1 lime and juice of 1 to 2 limes

2 tablespoons homemade or high-quality store-bought blueberry jam

14 teaspoon peeled, finely grated gingerroot

10 ounces good-quality white chocolate, such as Callebaut

12 teaspoon vegetable shortening

Tear or crumble the doughnuts into penny-size pieces until you have about 312 cups, letting them fall into a mixing bowl as you work. Add the crystallized ginger, salt and lime zest, tossing to incorporate.

Whisk together the lime juice (to taste), jam and gingerroot in a liquid measuring cup, then pour into the doughnut mixture and stir gently to combine. Taste, and add lime juice if you'd like the mixture to be less sweet.

Divide into 9 or 10 equal portions and roll into compact balls. Return them to the bowl and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes, until quite firm.

Meanwhile, combine the white chocolate and shortening in a microwave-safe bowl. Heat on low in 20-second increments until melted, stirring after each one. Once the mixture is smooth, cool slightly.

Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and set a wire cooling rack over it.

Working with one chilled doughnut ball at a time, dip the balls into the chocolate mixture to coat. Garnish with the crystallized ginger. Place on the wire rack until completely set, then transfer to an airtight container and refrigerate until ready to serve.

Makes 9 or 10 truffles.

Nutrition per piece (based on 10): 220 calories, 12 grams fat (6 grams saturated), 10 milligrams cholesterol, 2 grams protein, 26 grams carbohydrates, 0 dietary fiber, 150 milligrams sodium

Doughnut and Berry Pudding

This dessert has the crustiness of French toast and the berry gooeyness of pie. You can use any combination of berries that totals about 134 cups. When it comes out of the oven, it's puffed and golden; it deflates as it cools, but the taste will not suffer.

Paula Shoyer tested this recipe using regular-size glazed doughnuts and glazed doughnut holes; she decided that the pudding is so tasty, you should consider buying doughnuts just to prepare it. You can double the recipe for a 9-inch-by-13-inch pan, or halve the custard and berry amounts if you end up with just a few doughnuts sitting around.

Serve with vanilla ice cream.

The pudding can be refrigerated for up to 3 days.

From Shoyer, baking teacher and author of “The Kosher Baker” (Brandeis, 2010) and the upcoming “The Holiday Kosher Baker” (Sterling, 2013), which will include a chapter of unusual doughnut recipes.

5 to 6 glazed yeast doughnuts, preferably day-old (may substitute enough doughnut holes, halved, to cover the bottom of an 8-inch square pan, about 12 ounces)

3 large eggs, left at room temperature for about 10 minutes

12 cup sugar

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

112 cups whole milk

12 cup fresh blueberries

34 cup fresh raspberries

12 cup fresh blackberries

Vanilla ice cream, for serving

Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Have an 8-inch square baking pan at hand.

Cut each doughnut in half (creating two semicircles), then cut each half into 3 wedges (for a total of 6 pieces per doughnut). Arrange the doughnut pieces in the baking pan to cover the bottom in a single layer.

Whisk together the eggs, sugar and vanilla extract in a medium bowl, then whisk in the milk; this will form the custard.

Scatter the berries around the doughnut pieces, tucking some of them into the nooks and crannies. Pour the egg mixture on top and use a flexible spatula to press and submerge the doughnut pieces and some of the berries under the liquid; allow some berries to poke out. Let it sit for 10 minutes, pressing the doughnut pieces into the liquid every 5 minutes.

Bake for 45 minutes, until the custard has set and the doughnut pieces sticking out are browned. Cool for 15 minutes, then serve warm with vanilla ice cream.

Makes 12 to 16 servings.

Nutrition per serving (based on 16): 150 calories, 7 grams fat (3 grams saturated), 45 milligrams cholesterol, 3 grams protein, 19 grams carbohydrates, 50 milligrams sodium, 0 dietary fiber

Bayou Bakery Scrap Dough-Nut Buns

When there's extra beignet dough at Bayou Bakery, it's used to make sticky buns. This recipe uses half of the dough yield of chef David Guas' buttermilk beignet recipe from his 2010 cookbook with Raquel Pelzel, “DamGoodSweet.”

It also calls for Steen's pure cane syrup, a Lousiana specialty, which is available at Bayou Bakery in Arlington, Va. (703-243-2410) and can be ordered via Amazon.

The beignet dough needs to rest/rise for 1 hour. The buns need to rest/rise in their muffin tin wells for 20 minutes. The baked buns are best served the same day they are made.

From David Guas, chef-owner of Bayou Bakery in Arlington

For the dough:

512 tablespoons (about 3 ounces) whole milk

34 cup whole or low-fat buttermilk

2 teaspoons active dry yeast

114 tablespoons sugar

114 cups bread flour, plus extra for the work surface

14 teaspoon baking soda

18 teaspoon kosher salt

For the filling:

6 tablespoons (3 ounces) unsalted butter, at room temperature

6 tablespoons (3 ounces) light brown sugar

2 teaspoons all-purpose flour

112 teaspoons ground cinnamon

For the glaze:

12 cup Steen's 100 percent Pure Cane syrup (see headnote)

2 tablespoons bourbon, preferably Maker's Mark

14 cup crushed pecans, for sprinkling

For the dough: Heat the milk in a small saucepan over medium-high heat, just until bubbles form at the edges. Remove from the heat, then add the buttermilk.

Pour into the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a dough attachment. Whisk in the yeast and sugar; let sit for 5 minutes.

Add the bread flour, baking soda and salt, stirring a bit to incorporate. Beat on low speed until moistened, then increase the speed to medium, beating for several minutes, until the dough forms a loose ball yet is still fairly tacky and wet. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and set in a draft-free spot for 1 hour.

For the filling: Combine the butter, brown sugar, flour and cinnamon in a mixing bowl; blend well.

Use cooking oil spray to lightly grease the wells of a muffin pan (for regular-size muffins).

Lightly flour a work surface. Roll out the dough on the work surface to a rectangle that measures 8 inches by 18 inches. Spread 12 cup of the filling evenly over the surface, then roll tightly into a log. Seal the seam by pinching it tightly closed.

Cut the roll crosswise into 2-inch sections (for a total of 9 rolls), laying each one on its side in separate muffin wells, gently pressing down as you work. Lay a clean, slightly damp dish towel over the pan. Transfer to a warm, draft-free place for 20 minutes' rising time.

For the glaze: Stir the syrup and bourbon together in a medium bowl.

Heat the oven to 325 degrees. Spray the surface of the muffin tin with nonstick cooking spray; this will help remove any filling/glaze overflow from the baked buns.

Spread the tops of the rolls with the remaining filling. Use half of the glaze to brush on top, then sprinkle the pecans over the glaze. Bake for 15 minutes, until lightly golden. Upon removing the pan from the oven, immediately brush the tops of the buns with the remaining glaze.

Cool in the pan before serving.

Makes 9 servings.

Nutrition per serving: 280 calories, 11 grams fat (5 grams saturated), 20 milligrams cholesterol, 4 grams protein, 43 grams carbohydrates, 0 dietary fiber, 150 milligrams sodium

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Stories

  1. East Allegheny teachers maintain strike plans
  2. McKeesport Area teacher who had sex in classroom returns to school
  3. Committee to advise Munhall on vacant properties
  4. 2 held for arraignments in gun case
  5. Not to be left behind, speedy Steelers are on the fast track in NFL
  6. Rossi: Steelers will make small strides this season
  7. Feds to protect 20 coral species
  8. Steelers have plenty of new faces at wide receiver
  9. Disney files patent for drone-controlled puppets
  10. Starkey: Bucs still battlin’
  11. WPIAL coaches, QBs have concerns about using newly-approved footballs
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.