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A French take on gefilte fish

| Saturday, April 5, 2014, 6:21 p.m.
Diane Worthington
Whitefish Terrine With Beet-Horseradish Relish

It's that time again — the Passover holidays. I grew up with the classic gefilte fish served as a starter to the long Passover meal. Gefilte fish is basically a fish puree, poached and served chilled. Among my friends and family, people love it or don't want to see it on their plate. I came up with this terrine as a response to the gefilte fish naysayers. Many of them come back for seconds.

Ground whitefish is blended with sauteed sweet caramelized onions and carrots and then baked in a loaf pan rather than poached in liquid. The ground whitefish used here is the same fish used for the popular Jewish dish gefilte fish. If you can't find the fish ground, process the fillets in the food processor, making sure first to remove the skin and all the bones.

This needs to be made a day ahead of serving because it must be chilled.

Diane Rossen Worthington is a cookbook author and a James Beard award-winning radio show host. You can contact her at www.seriouslysimple.com.

Whitefish Terrine with Beet-Horseradish Relish

2 tablespoons olive oil

3 carrots, peeled and finely chopped

1 large onion, finely chopped

Nonstick cooking spray

3 large eggs

3 12 tablespoons matzo meal

34 cup chicken stock, fish stock or water

1 12 pounds ground whitefish or a mixture of whitefish, pike and buffalo fish

2 teaspoons salt

34 teaspoon white pepper

12 teaspoon sugar

1 tablespoon fresh lime juice

14 teaspoon paprika

For the sauce:

1 jar (5 ounces) prepared horseradish cream

2 medium beets, cooked

For garnish:

Lemon slices

Parsley sprigs

In a skillet, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the carrots and onion, and saute for 5 to 7 minutes, or until softened. Remove from the heat and let cool for 10 minutes.

Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Lightly coat a 9-inch by 5-inch by 2 12-inch loaf pan with nonstick cooking spray.

In a large bowl with an electric mixer set on medium speed, beat the eggs with the matzo meal. When well-combined, add the stock, fish, cooled carrots and onion, salt, pepper and sugar, and continue to beat until well-blended.

Pour the mixture into the prepared pan. Pick up the pan with both hands and slam it down on the counter to settle any air bubbles. Drizzle the lime juice over the top and sprinkle with the paprika. Bake for 50 to 60 minutes, or until a long wooden skewer inserted into the center comes out clean.

To prepare the sauce: Place the horseradish cream and cooked beets in a food processor and process until pureed. Transfer to a small container, cover and refrigerate.

Remove the terrine from the oven and let it cool for 15 minutes. Wrap it in aluminum foil and chill overnight.

Loosen the sides of the terrine from the pan by running a knife blade along the edges. Invert the terrine onto a plate, and then turn it upright on a platter. Slice the terrine into 34-inch slices. Garnish with lemon slices and parsley and serve with the beet-horseradish sauce.

Makes 10 to 12 servings.

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