Share This Page

Waldorf-inspired red velvet cake

| Saturday, May 17, 2014, 8:39 p.m.
Matthew Antonino - Fotolia
Red Velvet Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting.

Recently, I visited the famous Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York City. I was in town for the James Beard Awards, often referred to as “the Oscars of food and wine.” I dined at the hotel's Peacock Alley restaurant and, for dessert, ordered red velvet cake. It was as good as I had ever tasted.

The Waldorf's cake features canned beets as well as red food coloring. My recipe is inspired by the Waldorf's but only uses red food coloring. I like to make crumbs out of the sliced-off cake tops and then press them against the bottom half of the cake for a pretty decorative touch.

Diane Rossen Worthington is a cookbook author and a James Beard award-winning radio show host. You can contact her at www.seriouslysimple.com.

Diane's Red Velvet Cake With Cream Cheese Frosting

Butter, for greasing pan

2 cups cake flour, plus more for pan

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon baking powder

1 teaspoon baking soda

2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder

1 cup buttermilk

2 large eggs

2 teaspoons white vinegar

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

1 cup vegetable oil

2 cups sugar

1 ounce bottled red food coloring

For the frosting:

4 ounces unsalted butter, at room temperature

1 pound (two 8-ounce packages) cream cheese, at room temperature

18 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 12 cups confectioners' sugar

Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Butter and flour two 9-inch cake pans.

In a mixing bowl, whisk the flour, salt, baking powder, baking soda and cocoa powder.

In a glass measuring cup, combine the buttermilk, eggs, vinegar and vanilla and whisk together until blended.

Place the oil in a large mixing bowl. With an electric mixer on medium-speed, slowly add the sugar and beat until incorporated, for about 1 minute. Add the food coloring and beat until bright red. Alternate adding half of the dry and wet ingredients on medium speed. Repeat with the remaining ingredients, ending with the wet ingredients. Beat until there are no lumps.

Transfer the batter evenly into the cake pans. Bake for 34 to 38 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean from the middle of each cake. Remove the cakes and cool them in the pans. When cool, carefully loosen the sides of the cake and invert the layers onto cooling racks.

To prepare the frosting: Beat the butter and cream cheese together with an electric mixer on medium speed. Slowly beat in the vanilla and confectioners' sugar until incorporated; the mixture should be a thick frosting-like consistency.

Using a serrated knife, trim the top of each layer of cake so that it is flat. Arrange the first layer on a cake plate or serving platter, and spread frosting over the top and sides. Place the remaining layer right side up and frost the top and the sides until all of the cake is covered evenly. Serve immediately or refrigerate.

Makes a 2-layer, 9-inch cake.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.