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Dinner in Minutes: Flavor billows from Smoked Fish Salad

MCT
This salad with orzo and sliced tomatoes gets a moky note from the smoked trout. (Emily Michot/Miami Herald/MCT)

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Here are the ingredients you'll need to prepare tonight's Dinner in Minutes:

To buy: 3⁄4 pound smoked trout (or any smoked fish), 1 container nonfat plain yogurt, 1 bottle reduced-fat mayonnaise, 1 bottle prepared horseradish, 1 small bottle dill pickles, 1 package orzo, 1 medium tomato, 1 small bunch fresh dill or 1 bottle dried dill, 1 head Romaine lettuce

Staples: Onion, salt and black peppercorns

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By Linda Gassenheimer
Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2014, 9:00 p.m.
 

This smoked fish salad is a light and simple dish for a hot summer night.

I created this quick dinner with thoughts of a major smoked foods trend at this summer's Fancy Food Show.

There are many types of smoked fish available in supermarkets. My favorite for this Smoked Fish Salad is smoked trout. Any type of firm, smoked fish can be used.

Orzo is rice-shape pasta and can be found in the supermarket. It's easy to cook and makes a light salad. Also, the fresh tomato puree added to mayonnaise makes a bright, refreshing sauce for the salad.

Wine columnist Fred Tasker's wine suggestion is a sparkling wine.

Smoked Fish Salad

Water

1 cup sliced onion

14 cup reduced-fat mayonnaise

2 tablespoons nonfat plain yogurt

4 teaspoons prepared horseradish

1 tablespoon fresh dill, chopped or 1 teaspoon dried dill

34 pound smoked trout (or any smoked fish)

Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

14 cup diced dill pickle

Several Romaine lettuce leaves

Bring a pot of water to a boil. Drop the sliced onion into the boiling water. When the water returns to a boil, remove the onion with a slotted spoon and set it aside in a small bowl. Mix the mayonnaise, yogurt, horseradish and dill in a medium-size bowl. If there is any skin on the fish, remove it. Cut the fish into small pieces and add it to the mayonnaise sauce. Stir the mixture with a fork and break up the fish into small flakes. Season with salt and pepper. Add the onion and pickle. Mix well with the fork. Divide the lettuce leaves between two dinner plates and spoon the fish salad on top.

Makes 2 servings

Nutrition information per serving: 513 calories, 22 grams fat (4 grams saturated), 176 milligrams cholesterol, 65 grams protein, 11 grams carbohydrates, 2 grams dietary fiber, 1,036 milligrams sodium

Orzo Salad

Water

13 cup orzo

1 medium tomato

1 tablespoon reduced-fat mayonnaise

Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Bring a medium-size pot of water to a boil. Add the orzo, and cook it for 7 to 8 minutes. The orzo should be cooked through but still firm. Drain the orzo and add it to a medium-size bowl. Cut the tomato in half. Cut one half into 4 pieces, place the pieces in a food processor and puree. Add the mayonnaise and process until it is combined with the tomato. Mix the puree into the drained orzo. Season with salt and pepper. Cut the remaining half of the tomato into wedges. Divide the orzo between two dinner plates and place tomato wedges on the side.

Makes 2 servings.

Nutrition information per serving: 159 calories, 3 grams fat (1 gram saturated), 0 cholesterol, 5 grams protein, 28 grams carbohydrates, 2 grams dietary fiber, 60 milligrams sodium

Hints

The same water used to blanch the onion can be used to cook the orzo. Simply remove the onion from the boiling water with a slotted spoon and add the orzo.

Check the fish carefully for bones when cutting it.

Linda Gassenheimer is a food writer for the Miami Herald. Write to her in care of Living, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, D.L. Clark Building, 503 Martindale St., Pittsburgh, PA, 15212, or email tribliving@tribweb.com.

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