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How to maintain healthy posture

| Sunday, Sept. 6, 2015, 9:00 p.m.

Modern lifestyle factors, such as texting, reaching for your keyboard or wearing high heels, can create postural stressors that often cause muscle imbalances and injury. Having good posture is essential for good health.

“When some people try to work on their posture, they tend to overdo it,” says Alynn Kakuk, physical therapist at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program. “They get into a super-extended position with their shoulders way back — enough that it creates too much of an arch on their back. So, they just start shifting their weight too far back.”

Simple exercises, stretches and being conscious of your posture can eliminate these ramifications.

Stand up against a wall, and make sure your upper back, shoulders and bottom touch the wall. Your feet don't have to be against the wall — just a couple of inches away from it. You should have a slight space in your lower back and be able to fit your hands in that space. But make sure it's not a big gap. Then, step away from the wall, and try to see if you can maintain that position. Keep in mind, strengthening your muscles will make it easier for you to maintain that posture over time. Be careful of overdoing it or hyper-extending your back.

In a world filled with modern technology, reaching for your cellphone and keyboard are common movements. These movements can place stress on your upper back and neck, resulting in rounded shoulders and forward head. This can cause chronic upper back, shoulder and neck pain and headaches. Also, people may text so much that they develop pain and injury in their thumbs from that overuse.

Here are some tips on how to maintain the correct posture while using technology.

• Try to have your cellphone at eye level, so you're not bending forward.

• Do exercises that strengthen your upper back and shoulder, such as chest exercises to strengthen your pectoral muscles and diaphragmatic breathing techniques to release tension.

• Stay aware of your posture throughout the day. Those who sit at a desk all day should be conscious of posture and the importance of getting up at least once an hour to move.

• Ensure your keyboard is at elbow height, so your hands can rest on the desk.

• Place your computer at eye level. Place laptops on platforms for them to be at eye level.

• Set your chair at a height that your feet touch the ground.

• Take a walk or stretch break every hour.

• When wearing heels, ensure you draw in your abdominal muscles to prevent that extra curve in your low back. Try to limit the use of your heels. Pick a heel that is smaller with a wider surface area that will help distribute your foot and weight better.

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