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Everything old is cool again at annual Antiques on the Diamond in Ligonier

| Thursday, June 1, 2017, 8:55 p.m.
Mill Creek Antiques' Frank Mercurio at last year's Antiques on the Diamond show in Ligonier.
Submitted
Mill Creek Antiques' Frank Mercurio at last year's Antiques on the Diamond show in Ligonier.
A Singer Featherweight sewing machine, vintage saddle rack and vintage toys are among the items from Brandie Baughman of Lower Burrell, owner of Ariel’s Attic.
Submitted
A Singer Featherweight sewing machine, vintage saddle rack and vintage toys are among the items from Brandie Baughman of Lower Burrell, owner of Ariel’s Attic.
A black Carnival Westmoreland Glass rabbit owned by Dee Sacherich of DnL Antiques, Greensburg.
Submitted
A black Carnival Westmoreland Glass rabbit owned by Dee Sacherich of DnL Antiques, Greensburg.
Assortment of antiques and collectibles from Roberta Gallick of Trafford, who specializes in pottery and vintage linens.
Submitted
Assortment of antiques and collectibles from Roberta Gallick of Trafford, who specializes in pottery and vintage linens.

More than 50 dealers will display their finest antiques and collectibles at the 30th annual Antiques on the Diamond show and sale presented by the Ligonier Valley Chamber of Commerce.

John Mickinak of Greensburg and John Kroeck of Leetsdale will serve as show managers of the event from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 3 on the Diamond in Ligonier.

Susan Grunstra, the chamber's executive director, says proceeds from Antiques on the Diamond, which is held twice during the summer, and other events help the chamber to promote Ligonier “as a four-season destination where folks can shop, dine, play and stay.”

According to Mickinak, it's the wide variety of antiques, jewelry and furniture — in addition to the town's reputation — that draws people to the antiques and collectibles show and sale.

“There's something for everyone,” he says, “in a friendly atmosphere, beautiful town and surroundings with plenty of retail shops and fine restaurants — and also a great farmers market — all at the same time.”

Mickinak, owner of Ligonier Antique Gallery, says he holds the distinction of being the only dealer who has exhibited at every antiques shows on the Diamond since its beginning.

Antiques dealers from as close as Westmoreland, Allegheny and Fayette counties and as far away as Kissimmee, Fla.; Cumberland, Md.; and Youngstown, Ohio, will participate.

Dee Sacherich of DnL Antiques, Greensburg, has been collecting milk glass for more than 20 years and is a charter member of the National Milk Glass Collectors Society.

“As with most collectors, you reach a point where your collection is larger than your space,” she says. She decided to sell off some of the pieces and her duplicates and found she enjoyed selling.

“It was so much fun meeting new people, sharing my hobby and seeing someone else enjoying a piece from my collection. It got to the point when my husband, Larry, and I went antiquing, I spent more time looking for things to resell than for my own collection,” she says.

The couple, now retired, has an online store (dnl-antiques.com), and they have turned her part-time hobby into a full-time job.

Another dealer, Frank Mercurio, owner of Mill Creek Antiques, Ligonier, made his debut in 2016 at Antiques on the Diamond. Although new to selling antiques as a hobby, he has been collecting old and unique pieces for most of his life. His collection includes Civil War-era through 1920s in furniture and accessories — from dry sinks to rolling pins — along with Yellowware, Georges Briard drinkware, unique copper pieces, golf clubs and tools dating from Civil War to the 1950s.

“What I like most about being an antiques dealer is the interaction with the people, especially when you know you have sold an item that will be enjoyed for many years to come,” Mercurio says. “As a resident of Ligonier and because of the history here, I would like to have my own shop in town when I am fully retired.”

Also among the local dealers at the Ligonier antiques show:

• Dave Hess of Latrobe will have some of the accent tables and end stands he creates from repurposed antique treadle sewing machines. He breaks down the machines and restores them, using the original leg iron, cabinet drawers, lids, gingerbread trim and brass handles. all from the original machines. “I have quite a variety,” he says.

• Roberta Gallick of Trafford has been selling pottery, vintage linens and more for many years at the show. Among the interesting items is a souvenir tablecloth depicting the state of California.

• Brandie Baughman of Lower Burrell, owner of Ariel's Attic, will have an eclectic assortment of antique and vintage items. Her selection will include a Singer Featherweight sewing machine, unusual and hard-to-find pieces of Kensington Ware manufactured by Alcoa in New Kensington, a vintage saddle rack, vintage toys, lawn and garden furniture and décor, and primitive items.

The second Antiques on the Diamond event of the summer is scheduled for Aug. 26.

Candy Williams is a Tribune-Review contributing writer.

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