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Art auction focuses on nature-inspired works

Shirley McMarlin
| Thursday, Nov. 2, 2017, 8:55 p.m.
“Fields & Highlands,” pastel by Gail Beem
Submitted
“Fields & Highlands,” pastel by Gail Beem
“Vantage,' oil painting by Chas Fagan
Submitted
“Vantage,' oil painting by Chas Fagan
“Prairie Spirit,” stained glass pane by Mandy Sirofchuck
Submitted
“Prairie Spirit,” stained glass pane by Mandy Sirofchuck
“High Falls Gorge,” oil painting by Jaime Cooper
Submitted
“High Falls Gorge,” oil painting by Jaime Cooper

The beauty of nature will be spotlighted during “Hills and Highlands,” the Loyalhanna Watershed Association's upcoming annual art auction.

Kicking off at 6:30 p.m. Nov. 4 in the Barn at Ligonier Valley, the association's 33rd art auction benefit will feature landscapes and other nature-inspired works from about 30 artists hailing from as close as Ligonier and as far as Colorado.

New this year will be pottery from Dr. Francis DeFabo of Unity; stained glass from Mandy Sirofchuck, owner of Main Exhibit Gallery in Ligonier; and woven shawls from Pamelajean Werner of Mt. Pleasant, according to the watershed executive director Susan Huba.

The silent and live auctions also will include items from noted regional artists who have contributed to the event for many years, including Rita Haldeman, Ron Donoughe and Bud Gibbons.

Ligonier native Chas Fagan, whose work includes oil portraits of all 45 U.S. presidents, has contributed an oil titled “Vantage,” Huba says.

The evening will begin with an open-bar reception with silent auction, appetizers and music by The Bricks. For dinner, guests will find filet of beef sliders, miso-glazed salmon and pesto chicken breast from Carson's Catering, along with cupcakes from Carly Morel Cakery.

Auctioneer Larry Hendrick will preside over the live auction portion of the event.

Auction proceeds benefit Loyalhanna Watershed Association's land and water conservation projects, Huba says. The 298-square-mile Loyalhanna Creek Watershed originates on the western slope of the Laurel Ridge south of Ligonier Township and flows northwest through Ligonier, Latrobe and New Alexandria to Saltsburg, where it meets the Conemaugh River to form the Kiskiminetas River.

Event underwriters are Armstrong/McKay Foundation, McFeely-Rogers Foundation, Josh and Marion Wetzel and David and Molly Miller.

Tickets start at $100.

Details: 724-238-7560 or loyalhannawatershed.org

Shirley McMarlin is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 724-836-5750, smcmarlin@tribweb.com or via Twitter @shirley_trib.

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