ShareThis Page

Seton Hill University to hold annual Kristallnacht Remembrance service

Shirley McMarlin
| Thursday, Nov. 2, 2017, 11:24 a.m.
Student Teressa Liburd lights a candle during the 2016 Kristallnacht Remembrance Interfaith Service at Seton Hill University in Greensburg. The annual service commemorates 'the night of broken glass,' a pogrom on Nov. 9-10, 1938, when Nazis burned synagogues, looted Jewish homes and businesses and killed people throughout Nazi-controlled areas.
Steph Chambers | Tribune-Review
Student Teressa Liburd lights a candle during the 2016 Kristallnacht Remembrance Interfaith Service at Seton Hill University in Greensburg. The annual service commemorates 'the night of broken glass,' a pogrom on Nov. 9-10, 1938, when Nazis burned synagogues, looted Jewish homes and businesses and killed people throughout Nazi-controlled areas.

The annual Kristallnacht Remembrance Interfaith Service will begin at 6 p.m. Nov. 7 in St. Joseph Chapel at Seton Hill University in Greensburg.

This year's service marks the 79th anniversary of the events of Nov. 9-10, 1938, when Nazis burned synagogues, looted Jewish homes and businesses and killed individuals throughout Germany, Austria and other Nazi-controlled areas in a pogram known as Kristallnacht, “the night of broken glass.”

The term alludes to broken glass from windows shattered at Jewish-owned businesses. Kristallnacht resulted in the deaths of 91 Jews, the looting of 7,000 Jewish businesses, the arrest of 30,000 Jewish males and the desecration or destruction of 267 synagogues.

Speakers at the service will be Holocaust survivors Ruth Drescher, Yolanda Willis and Shulamit Bastacky, all of Pittsburgh.

Seton Hill graduates Kierhan Boyle and Brandon McNeill will receive the Ethel LeFrak Outstanding Student Scholar of the Holocaust Award, which recognizes students whose research demonstrates a keen and advanced understanding of the Holocaust or another genocide.

The service is sponsored by the university's National Catholic Center for Holocaust Education and the Office of Campus Ministry. Seton Hill has observed the anniversary of Kristallnacht with an annual service since the Holocaust education center was established in November 1987.

The center was a response to the urging of Pope John Paul II to recognize the significance of the Holocaust and to “promote the necessary historical and religious studies on this event which concerns the whole of humanity today.” Its primary purpose is the broad dissemination of scholarship on the root causes of anti-Semitism, its relation to the Holocaust and the implications from the Catholic perspective of both for today's world.

Details: 800-826-6234 or setonhill.edu

Shirley McMarlin is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 724-836-5750, smcmarlin@tribweb.com or via Twitter @shirley_trib.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.