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Night of Worship brings New Kensington, Lower Burrell Catholic churches together

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop
| Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018, 4:12 p.m.
The Steubenville Night of Worship (NOW) is from 7 to 9 p.m.  Feb. 8, at Mount St. Peter Parish, 100 Freeport Road, in New Kensington.
Dan Speicher | For The Tribune-Review
The Steubenville Night of Worship (NOW) is from 7 to 9 p.m. Feb. 8, at Mount St. Peter Parish, 100 Freeport Road, in New Kensington.
The Steubenville Night of Worship (NOW) is from 7 to 9 p.m.  Feb. 8, at Mount St. Peter Parish, 100 Freeport Road, in New Kensington.
Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
The Steubenville Night of Worship (NOW) is from 7 to 9 p.m. Feb. 8, at Mount St. Peter Parish, 100 Freeport Road, in New Kensington.

The Steubenville Night of Worship (NOW) is from 7 to 9 p.m. Feb. 8, at Mount St. Peter Parish, 100 Freeport Road in New Kensington.

The event is a collaboration among the four Catholic churches in New Kensington and Lower Burrell.

In an attempt to bring Catholics to what Pope Francis calls a “renewed encounter” with Christ, the evening will feature dynamic praise and worship, engaging talks and the opportunity to be renewed and energized in your faith.

It's presented by the Franciscan University of Steubenville, which is renowned for its vibrant evangelism.

The topic is “The Feast Before the Fast: How to Have the Best Easter Ever,” presented by Bob Rice.

“It is an opportunity to renew or rediscover your relationship with Jesus, to energize and deepen your faith, and to jump start your Lenten experience,” says Elizabeth Haberstroh, Mount St. Peter pastoral associate, via email. “It's not your grandmother's Catholic Mass.”

At Christmas, Mount St. Peter parishioners received “Rediscover Jesus” by Matthew Kelly, which entices readers to get to know Jesus in a deeply personal way. Parishioners will again use this book to guide them through Lent, which begins with Ash Wednesday, Feb. 14.

Monsignor Michael Begolly, pastor of Mount St. Peter says via email the event is a way to help people rediscover their faith.

“Participants can become engaged in the event in their own way — either energetically with enthusiasm for the songs and the Spirit or seriously reflecting on the reverence of the Eucharist,” he says “Or both. Everyone can delve deeply into this faith-filled experience.”

John Hutchins of Greensburg and his wife, Kim, are planning to attend. They are liaisons for the Diocese of Greensburg for the Holy Spirit School of Prayer, which is part of the Catholic Charismatic Renewal, a spiritual movement that vibrantly praises God and asks the Holy Spirit to take over. The movement began in 1967 when a group of Duquesne University students met for a retreat in Gibsonia.

Hutchins says via email the uplifted hands and energetic music that are part of the Steubenville NOW program are like the Holy Spirit School of Prayer groups that meet at churches around the diocese.

“It's not typically how we celebrate mass, but the music is just a form of praise and it's uplifting,” Hutchins says. “It's total surrender to God and acknowledging Jesus is our Lord and Savior.”

Hutchins says some people are heading to non-denominational churches and away from traditional religious services seeking a more energetic type of worship and praise.

“They don't realize we have that here in the Catholic church also,” Hutchins says.

The event is free.

Details: 724-335-9877 or mountsaintpeter.org

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 724-853-5062 or jharrop@tribweb.com or via Twitter @Jharrop_Trib.

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