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Coping with Kids: Plush sleep doll, teens and media study

| Monday, March 25, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
www.schnoozles.com
Shnoozles plush dolls are designed to help kids sleep.

Plus dolls help kids get to sleep

American kids aren't getting enough sleep, and that makes them vulnerable to health and behavioral problems, according to a study published by the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine.

Shnoozles plush dolls are designed to help kids sleep. The dolls have patented “Schnoozle” eyes that look sleepy, and the dolls provide a soothing snuggle buddy at bedtime. Schnoozle dolls have no batteries or lights or anything else that could keep a child awake. Schnoozles ($24.99) come in pink and brown characters.

Details: www.schnoozles.com

Pets is focus of American Girl magazine

The March/April issue of American Girl magazine focuses on pet topics for kids, including how to take pictures of your pets by getting them to sit still, creating a good background and the like. The issue includes recipes for Animal Snackers and tells the Hearts and Hooves story of a girl and how she tamed her wild mustang Jacuzzi.

American Girl also gives illustrated instructions on how to use wax paper, a toothpick, a fine-point marker and nontoxic, air-dry modeling clay to make sea-theme Petite Pets. You can create a colorful octopus, crab, sea turtle, Nemo-like fish, and more.

Details: www.americangirlmagazine.com

Penn State offers Kid Care Program

The Penn State Better Kid Care Program is offering a morning of play and exploration for parents and kids.

The play date will be from 9 a.m. to noon April 13 at the Penn State Extension Office, 214 Donohoe Road, Greensburg.

“ZOOM! Exploring How Things Move” will show how, while engaged in play, most children experiment with phenomena such as force, motion and gravity — all concepts that incorporate the content areas of math, science and more.

This program is suitable for boys and girls ages 3 through 8.

Registration fee is $5 per family. Call 724-837-1402 to register.

Teen clothing websites emphasize body part

In 2011, Kenyon College Researchers examining the top 15 tween/teen clothing websites looked at 5,666 pieces of clothing and found only 69 percent of the clothing was age-appropriate.

The remaining 31 percent revealed or emphasized a body part, had sexualized characteristics or had sexually suggestive writing, mostly used to emphasize the breasts and buttocks.

Teens and sex in the media, new research by the American Psychological Association, found that sexual imagery aimed at younger girls is harmful to them and increases the likelihood they will “experience body dissatisfaction, depression and lower self-esteem.”

— Staff and wire reports

Send parenting news to Coping With Kids in care of Rebecca Killian, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, D.L. Clark Building, 503 Martindale St., Pittsburgh, PA 15212, or e-mail rkillian@tribweb.com.

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