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Polamalu preps for 'Mane Event'

Procter & Gamble - Steelers safety Troy Polamalu is known for hard hitting and his hair. He has been doing commercials for Head & Shoulders for several years.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Procter & Gamble</em></div>Steelers safety Troy Polamalu is known for hard hitting and his hair. He has been doing commercials for Head & Shoulders for several years.
File - Farrah Fawcett
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>File</em></div>Farrah Fawcett
Getty Images - PASADENA, CA - JANUARY 17: Executive producer/host Donald Trump of 'The Apprentice' speaks during the 2007 Winter Television Critics Association Press Tour for NBC at the Ritz-Carlton Huntington Hotel on January 17, 2007 in Pasadena, California. (Photo by Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images)
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Getty Images</em></div>PASADENA, CA - JANUARY 17:  Executive producer/host Donald Trump of 'The Apprentice' speaks during the 2007 Winter Television Critics Association Press Tour for NBC at the Ritz-Carlton Huntington Hotel on January 17, 2007 in Pasadena, California.  (Photo by Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images)
File - Jennifer Aniston in her early 'Friends' days
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>File</em></div>Jennifer Aniston in her early 'Friends' days
AP - This undated file photo shows famed physicist Albert Einstein. Scientists at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, or CERN, the world's largest physics lab, say they have clocked subatomic particles, called neutrinos, traveling faster than light, a feat that, if true, would break a fundamental pillar of science, the idea that nothing is supposed to move faster than light, at least according to Einstein's special theory of relativity: The famous E (equals) mc2 equation. That stands for energy equals mass times the speed of light squared. The readings have so astounded researchers that they are asking others to independently verify the measurements before claiming an actual discovery. (AP Photo)
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>AP</em></div>This undated file photo shows famed physicist Albert Einstein. Scientists at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, or CERN, the world's largest physics lab, say they have clocked subatomic particles, called neutrinos, traveling faster than light, a feat that, if true, would break a fundamental pillar of science, the idea that nothing is supposed to move faster than light, at least according to Einstein's special theory of relativity: The famous E (equals) mc2 equation. That stands for energy equals mass times the speed of light squared. The readings have so astounded researchers that they are asking others to independently verify the measurements before claiming an actual discovery. (AP Photo)
File - Elvis Presley
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>File</em></div>Elvis Presley
- Princess Leia, played by Carrie Fisher in 'Star Wars'
Princess Leia, played by Carrie Fisher in 'Star Wars'
File - Christopher 'Kid' Reid of '80s hip-hop duo Kid 'n' Play
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>File</em></div>Christopher 'Kid' Reid  of '80s hip-hop duo Kid 'n' Play
File - Mr. T
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>File</em></div>Mr. T
File - Julie Roberts
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>File</em></div>Julie Roberts
File - Keri Russell with the hair that made her famous in 'Felicity'
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>File</em></div>Keri Russell with the hair that made her famous in 'Felicity'
File - Audrey Hepburn
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>File</em></div>Audrey Hepburn
ASSOCIATED PRESS - Actor Robert Pattinson poses for a portrait in Beverly Hills, Calif. on Saturday, Nov. 8, 2008. (AP Photo/Matt Sayles)
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>ASSOCIATED PRESS</em></div>Actor Robert Pattinson poses for a portrait in Beverly Hills, Calif. on Saturday, Nov. 8, 2008. (AP Photo/Matt Sayles)
Evan Agostini/Invision/AP - Miley Cyrus attends the Fashion Group International's 30th annual 'Night Of Stars' awards gala at Cipriani's Wall Street on Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2013 in New York. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP)
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Evan Agostini/Invision/AP</em></div>Miley Cyrus attends the Fashion Group International's 30th annual 'Night Of Stars' awards gala at Cipriani's Wall Street on Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2013 in New York. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP)
ASSOCIATED PRESS - Olympic gold medalist Dorothy Hamill freshens up before resuming skating practice, Sept. 14, 1976 at the Civic Arena in Pittsburgh, Penn., where she will make her professional skating debut as the star of the Ice Capades on September 15. (AP Photo)
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>ASSOCIATED PRESS</em></div>Olympic gold medalist Dorothy Hamill freshens up before resuming skating practice, Sept. 14, 1976 at the Civic Arena in Pittsburgh, Penn., where she will make her professional skating debut as the star of the Ice Capades on September 15. (AP Photo)

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Famous manes

Like Troy Polamalu, there are other public figures who have distinct 'dos that make them stand out. A slew of celebrities are known for their lovely, lush or simply laughable heads of hair.

Ladies like Jennifer Aniston, Julia Roberts, Dorothy Hamill, Audrey Hepburn and Farrah Fawcett have sported some of the most coveted coifs in the country. Guys like Elvis, Einstein, Justin Bieber, Robert Pattinson and Donald Trump all have donned memorable 'dos.

So what makes a person's hair go from simple statement to iconic style?

Acclaimed hair stylist and salon owner Philip Pelusi says unforgettable hair happens most commonly when the look mirrors a celebrity's personality — i.e. Audrey Hepburn's sophisticated upsweep or Sophia Loren's sultry styles.

“It's about the right place at the right time,” Pelusi says. “Take Jennifer Aniston. A lot of people relate to her. There is something in that spirit she captures and emotes.”

Aniston made news this week when she showed off a new chin-length bob.

“With Miley Cyrus, some people can relate to (her most recent hairdo) and see a certain perception of freedom to do that.”

In the past, certain styles would be requested in salons for years, like Hamill's wedge and Jane Fonda's shag. Today, the trends move much quicker to keep pace with a never-ending celebrity-news stream, Pelusi says.

“Now, there are more choices, more variety,” he says.

Izear Winfrey, artistic director at Studio Booth, Shadyside, says today's biggest trend is the long, soft waves sported by the likes of Jennifer Lopez and Kim Kardashian and Taylor Swift.

While trends tend to stick around for years, the most popular celebrities are the ones who aren't afraid to try something new, Winfrey says.

“A lot of celebrities who stay in the business the longest are constantly changing and reinventing themselves,” he says, citing examples like Madonna, Pink, Gwen Stefani and Rihanna. “They keep it new and fresh.”

— Rachel Weaver

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By Rachel Weaver
Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013, 5:44 p.m.
 

It will be the scissor-snip heard round the 'Burgh.

Steelers safety Troy Polamalu, keeper of the most illustrious locks in the NFL, will cut his hair at Heinz Field on Veterans Day, Nov. 11, to benefit Veterans of Foreign Wars.

“Troy Polamalu has one of the most famous heads of hair in America,” says John Hamilton, VFW Adjutant General. “To have him take a role in our efforts is appreciated. We hope this event will help bring public awareness to the vital work the VFW is doing on behalf of those who deserve it most — our nation's veterans, military and their families.”

The event is part of the VFW's “Mane Event,” a fundraising campaign in which participants solicit donations from friends and family, then get a haircut and post a picture of the results online.

Polamalu and his wife, Theodora, are longtime supporters of veterans, as several of their family members and friends have served. They are founders of the Harry Panos Fund for Veterans, named for Theodora's grandfather who fought in World War II. The fund provides support for military-focused charities.

Polamalu is dismayed by the lack of moral support for veterans in today's society.

“Unfortunately, we live in a society now that is all about, ‘What have you done for me lately?' ” he says. “Once a veteran is done with his service, we just kind of forget about him. I don't think anybody could argue against the fact that they've done more for this country than any other person.”

To draw attention to the issues, Polamalu will give his famous mane a “ceremonial” trim. He'll only lose a 3-inch lock, but the cut is still significant — it's the first time scissors have touched his head in more than a decade.

For Polamalu, hair is about more than making a style statement.

“Every time a piece of my hair comes out, and I look at a 20-inch strand, I'm like, ‘Wow, what happened when this first started growing?'” he says. “You think about all the life experience that you've had, and my hair's been a part of me. It's kind of become my fifth appendage and my identity.”

No one in the Polamalu family brushes that sentiment off.

“We don't even cut our children's hair,” Polamalu says. “They'll joke around like, ‘Daddy, I want my hair like that,' and it's like, ‘Son, in this family, that's blasphemy.”

To donate, visit www.vfwmaneevent.org

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