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Coping with Kids: Loom Boom organizes bracelets

Monday, March 10, 2014, 9:00 p.m.
 

Do your kids like making loom bracelets but are making a mess with their craft? Look at The Original Loom Boom, designed to organize, display, transport and share the bracelets.

The boom's brightly colored tubes can hold as many as 40 bracelets. The tubes are detachable from the base so that loomers can move and share them. The loom — which sells for $9.99 at Toys‘R'Us — also contains extra storage for bands, clips and more.

Details: www.theloomboom.com

Nominations accepted for breastfeeding friendly sites

Allegheny County Health Department, in cooperation with Allegheny County Breastfeeding Coalition, is seeking nominations for its annual Breastfeeding Friendly Place awards.

The awards are presented to workplaces, public places and other sites away from home that make an extra effort to help breastfeeding moms by offering a positive attitude and supportive environment.

Employers can help moms by offering flex time or extended paid maternity leave; a health plan with breast-pump coverage; worksite day care; and provisions for breastfeeding at work such as an appropriate place, time for pumping milk and refrigerator to store the milk.

To nominate an employer, public place or other site outside the home for the awards, call the Health Department at 412-687-2243, or visit www.achd.net. Nominations will be accepted until May 16.

Some pediatricians consider dropping vaccines because of cost

Ten percent of pediatricians say they have seriously considered no longer providing vaccines as a result of concerns about the cost, according to results from a 2011 survey reported by Reuters Health.

Food stamp program may reduce food insecurity for children

A program that provides nutrition assistance to millions of low-income families may be linked to improved well-being among children, according to a new study. Researchers found that children in households that participated in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) for six months had substantial improvements in their consistent access to food — or “food security.”

Smoking tied to changes in structure of teen brains

Young smokers who have smoked more cigarettes have clear differences in their brains compared to lighter smokers, according to a new study. “Earlier studies of older participants showed that the smokers had structural differences in various brain regions,” said senior author Edythe D. London. And in studies of adolescent animals, nicotine damaged and killed brain cells, added London, from the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA and the David Geffen School of Medicine in Los Angeles.

“While the results do not prove causation, they suggest that there are effects of cigarette exposure on brain structure in young smokers, with a relatively short smoking history,” London said.

Send parenting news to Coping With Kids in care of Rebecca Killian, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, D.L. Clark Building, 503 Martindale St., Pittsburgh, PA 15212, or e-mail rkillian@tribweb.com.

 

 
 


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