Share This Page

How to argue with your spouse — the right way

| Sunday, March 9, 2014, 9:00 p.m.

Fighting with your spouse is perfectly normal. Not letting the sparks fly once in a while is a good indicator that one or both partners are feeling apathetic and would be better off apart. Children are extremely sensitive to the emotions of the adults around them, and the fights they're witnessing are almost certainly affecting your kids. There's a right way — and lots of wrong ways — to fight. Here's what to keep in mind.

Slow down. It's not easy, but whenever you feel a fight brewing, try to take a break. That doesn't mean ignoring whatever the problem is, it just means that you and your wife will agree, in advance, to wait a while — maybe until the kids are in bed — to have your discussion. There's a good chance that when the appointed time finally arrives, you'll have forgotten what you were arguing about in the first place or it won't seem nearly as important as it did just a few hours before.

Keep it private. To the extent possible, do your squabbling out of earshot of the kids. If you can't put some distance between you and the kids, at least try to keep your voice at a conversational level.

Be nice. In the heat of the moment, it can take only a heartbeat to go from simply arguing to saying something you don't mean and may never be able to take back. Contrary to popular wisdom, words can do just as much (or more) damage as those famous sticks and stones.

Figure out what you're actually arguing about. Whether the fight started because you put the big pot in the wrong cupboard or because your wife forgot to pay the garbage bill, chances are good that that's not the real reason for your spat. At their core, most arguments have to do with either stress about money (not earning enough or spending too much) or labor (not doing enough or feeling overworked). Try to think about what's really going on and why it's so upsetting. Spending the time to dig a little deeper and to consider the root causes can be remarkably helpful.

Let the kids see you fight. Yes, that might sound completely contradictory to the previous advice, but it's important for kids to see how you and your spouse handle conflict. The idea that it's possible to disagree with someone respectfully without destroying the relationship is huge — and somewhat counterintuitive. Watching Mom and Dad argue, resolve differences, apologize and make up can give them a model for how they'll handle their quarrels — with each other, with friends, and with romantic partners in the not too distant future.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.