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Out & About

Out & About: Seton Hill celebrates its Centennial Year

| Sunday, Jan. 28, 2018, 9:00 p.m.
(left) The Most Reverend Edward C. Malesic, JCL, Bishop of the Diocese of Greensburg, Ruth Grant, Chair of the Seton Hill Board of Trustees, Sr. Catherine Meinert, SC, Provincial Superior of the Sisters of Charity of Seton Hill, and Seton Hill President, Mary C. Finger, Ed.D., gather during the Seton Hill Centennial Reception, held at Cecilian Hall, Seton Hill University, on Friday, January 26, 2018.
Rebecca Emanuele | for the Tribune-Review
(left) The Most Reverend Edward C. Malesic, JCL, Bishop of the Diocese of Greensburg, Ruth Grant, Chair of the Seton Hill Board of Trustees, Sr. Catherine Meinert, SC, Provincial Superior of the Sisters of Charity of Seton Hill, and Seton Hill President, Mary C. Finger, Ed.D., gather during the Seton Hill Centennial Reception, held at Cecilian Hall, Seton Hill University, on Friday, January 26, 2018.
(left) Seton Hill Mascot,  Sierra Megonnell, and Kyle Lovisone, both freshman, greet guests during the reception.
Rebecca Emanuele | for the Tribune-Review
(left) Seton Hill Mascot, Sierra Megonnell, and Kyle Lovisone, both freshman, greet guests during the reception.
Centennial Wall designers (left) Aaron Woodward, Seton Hill Alumni Barbara Martin, Frank Speney, and Mike Martin, all of KMA Design, Pittsburgh, gather during the reception.
Rebecca Emanuele | for the Tribune-Review
Centennial Wall designers (left) Aaron Woodward, Seton Hill Alumni Barbara Martin, Frank Speney, and Mike Martin, all of KMA Design, Pittsburgh, gather during the reception.
(left) Sr. Louise Grundish, gathers with SHU junior, Colleen Malley, who portrayed Mother Aloysia Lowe during the event.
Rebecca Emanuele | for the Tribune-Review
(left) Sr. Louise Grundish, gathers with SHU junior, Colleen Malley, who portrayed Mother Aloysia Lowe during the event.
(left) Alumni Richard and Joanna Stillwagon of Greensburg gather with Sr. Mary Norbert as they view the Centennial Wall.
Rebecca Emanuele | for the Tribune-Review
(left) Alumni Richard and Joanna Stillwagon of Greensburg gather with Sr. Mary Norbert as they view the Centennial Wall.
The Seton Hill University community, alumni and guests gather to view the Centennial Wall during a reception held at Cecilian Hall, on Friday, January 26, 2018.  From left: Sr. Mary Ann Winters, Sr. Hyeon Lee, and Sr. Georgia Litzenberg.
Rebecca Emanuele | for the Tribune-Review
The Seton Hill University community, alumni and guests gather to view the Centennial Wall during a reception held at Cecilian Hall, on Friday, January 26, 2018. From left: Sr. Mary Ann Winters, Sr. Hyeon Lee, and Sr. Georgia Litzenberg.
(center) SHU sophomore, Halle Polechko, portrays a 1970's student, while SHU senior, Brendon Mendelson, and freshman, Kyle Sisk, portray the first male graduating class of 1986.
Rebecca Emanuele | for the Tribune-Review
(center) SHU sophomore, Halle Polechko, portrays a 1970's student, while SHU senior, Brendon Mendelson, and freshman, Kyle Sisk, portray the first male graduating class of 1986.
(left) Sr. Mary Ann Winters gives history to the images to novice, Sr. Hyeon Lee.
Rebecca Emanuele | for the Tribune-Review
(left) Sr. Mary Ann Winters gives history to the images to novice, Sr. Hyeon Lee.
(left) Sr. Mary Ann Winters gives history to the images to novice, Sr. Hyeon Lee.
Rebecca Emanuele | for the Tribune-Review
(left) Sr. Mary Ann Winters gives history to the images to novice, Sr. Hyeon Lee.

Seton Hill University kicked off its Centennial Year celebration with a reception on Jan. 26 in Cecilian Hall on the hilltop Greensburg campus.

The program included remarks by university President Mary Finger and Sister Catherine Meinert, provincial superior of the Sisters of Charity of Seton Hill, along with a blessing by Bishop Edward C. Malesic of the Diocese of Greensburg, a video presentation and a champagne toast.

Guests also viewed a Centennial Wall, a graphic mural which documents key moments and figures in 100 years of history since Seton Hill became a four-year institution in 1918.

Seton Hill College was established 36 years after the Sisters of Charity purchased 200 acres of rolling farmland overlooking Greensburg.

Its charter allowed the new women's college to confer bachelor of arts degrees in arts and music, and bachelor of science degrees in home economics. Courses of study have increased over the years, men have been admitted and the college became a university in 2002.

— Shirley McMarlin

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