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Ligonier Valley Historical Society Festival of Lights visitors may purchase decorative items

| Sunday, Dec. 2, 2012, 8:51 p.m.
Festival of Lights chairperson, Kim Bellas-Matrunics, (L), joins Ligonier Valley Historical Society Director of Operations, Tina Yandrick, at the Ligonier Valley Historical Society 30th annual Festival of Lights, held in the Ligonier Town Hall community room on Friday evening, November 30, 2012. Kim Stepinsky | For The Tribune-Review

On Friday evening, the Ligonier Town Hall community room was transformed into a glittering, glowing wonderland of Christmas trees, holiday wreaths and star decorations for the opening of the 30th annual Ligonier Valley Historical Society Festival of Lights.

Reception guests had first dibs on 56 decorative items, courtesy of that evening's silent auction. The remaining items can be purchased during festival hours, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily, to be claimed on Sunday when the festival closes.

Design aesthetics ran the gamut from paper chains and popsicle stick reindeer crafted by R.K. Mellon Elementary School kindergartners to luxe adornments artfully placed by the hands of professionals.

Festival chairwoman is Kim Bellas-Matrunics. Others helping with the many tasks of organization include Ginny Widich, Jeanne Hines, Michelle Kent, Mary Jo Culbertson, Terry Coyne, Mary Ann Hegan, Cindy Purnell, Nancy Rost, Candy Bellas, Karen O'Connor, Rachel Roehrig and Stan andDeborah Cycak.

Seen at the reception: Tina Yandrick, Phil and Gladys Light, Madelon Sheedy, Pat Wallace and Kim Dickert Wallace, Bill and Bonnie Hoffman, Paul and Patsy Kennedy, Annie Urban, Bruce Robinson, Veronica Brighton, Ann Macdonald, Jim and Cathy Koontz, Mike Matrunics, Butch Bellas, Ron Nicely, Tom and Dee Sylvester, Elizabeth Grosklos, Kristin Wilkins and Nathan Kappel.

— Shirley McMarlin

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