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Out & About: Quilter talks about her craft at art museum luncheon

| Sunday, Jan. 20, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art at Ligonier Valley auxiliary president, Barbara Kravits, (L), of Ligonier, joins speaking artist, Peggy Black, of Jenners Township, Somerset County, during the Lunch a l'Art, held at the Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art at Ligonier Valley on Thursday afternoon, January 17, 2013. Kim Stepinsky | For The Tribune-Review

Art quilter Peggy Black was the guest speaker at the year's first Lunch a l'Art program, held Thursday at the Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art at Ligonier Valley.

She started by saying that in her “real life,” she is an accountant, adding, “I'm not a trained artist; I take classes on the Internet.”

That disclaimer seemed irrelevant after the Somerset resident started showing her slides and pulling out examples of her work. The “oohs” and “aahs” from the ladies at lunch were enough to confirm Black's artistic credentials.

Noting that she is not a traditionalist in her approach to quilting, Black discussed her methods, throwing about terms such as monoprint, nature print, stencils and fusable appliques.

She said art quilters “do with a needle what other artists do with a pencil or paint.”

Audience members Kathy Hayes and Barbara Lynne had done just that, arriving in handmade quilted vests of their own design.

Accompanying Black was her friend, Loretta Coleman.

Site coordinator Sommer Toffle worked the lights and helped to set up the props.

Seen at SAMA: Joyce Collins, Peggy Shepler, Sharon Vito-McCue, Helen Thorne, Bonnie Hoffman, Audrey Tostevin, Vernie West, Betty Hamner, Sue Kiren, Margot Reynolds, Joyce Kubanic, Gay Wasserman, Vivian Coombe, Gretchen Griffith and Glenda Dickson.

— Shirley McMarlin

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