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22nd annual Conservation and Sportsmen's Banquet in Hempfield

| Sunday, Feb. 3, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
Tribune-Review
2013 banquet committee members (from left), Chris Klanica, David Sartoris (holding Elhew English Pointer, 'Remy'), Joe Frederick and Roy McMahan gather at the Western Allegheny Chapter of the Ruffed Grouse Society 22nd annual Sportsmen's Banquet, held at the Ramada Hotel and Conference Center in Greensburg on Friday, Feb. 1, 2013. Kim Stepinsky | For The Tribune-Review

The Western Allegheny Chapter of the Ruffed Grouse Society hosted the 22nd annual Conservation and Sportsmen's Banquet Friday at the Ramada Hotel and Conference Center in Hempfield.

More than 200 people braved the cold to attend the auction event, which benefited the conservation group established in 1961.

The Society's mission is to restore and protect ruffed grouse and American woodcock habitats, and Pennsylvania is one of the most active states in terms of habitat projects and in chapter, membership and fundraising numbers.

There were games, prizes, drawings and auctions of firearms, artwork and collectibles.

A live auction conducted by Larry Hendrick offered a chance to bid on Remy, an English Pointer donated by David Sartoris of Latrobe.

Sartoris, a member of the event committee, attended with his wife, Teresa, and their children, LaVeda, Daniel and Porsche, who helped with raising and training the dog and her littermates.

At 4 months, Remy is already pointing to birds and represents fine confirmation, personality and temperament.

Seen: Roy and Tracey McMahan, Joe and Lisa Fredrick, Lisa Rossi, Marty Woods, with his son, Aaron, Christian Klanica, Joseph and Linda Frydrych, with their sons, Jeffrey, Joseph and Chad, Ron Duvall and Raymond Malicki, with his son, Dr. Mark Malicki.

— Dawn Law

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