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'Being Battle Weary' is topic at NAACP Prayer Breakfast

| Monday, Feb. 11, 2013, 11:06 a.m.
(From left) Adrienne Russell, the Rev. Dr. Jack Sullivan Jr., Mary Ann Strader and Ruth Tolbert gather at the annual Greensburg-Jeannette NAACP Prayer Breakfast, on Feb. 9, 2013, at the Bishop Connare Center in Greensburg. Kim Stepinsky | For The Tribune-Review

“The prayer of a righteous person is powerful and effective.” So says the biblical Book of James.

Just imagine, then, what can happen when a whole roomful of good people get together for the purpose of prayer.

That was the scene Saturday morning in the Bishop Connare Center east of Greensburg, at the annual Greensburg-Jeannette NAACP Prayer Breakfast.

The first answered prayer was that good weather and dry roads prevailed, by no means a given for a February event, so that travelers arrived unscathed and unstressed.

Never giving up in prayer was the theme of the message, “Being Battle Weary,” given by Mary Ann Strader of Pittsburgh's West End, an associate pastor with Victorious Faith Evangelistic Outreach in Pittsburgh.

Welcoming the crowd was the Rev. Dr. Jack Sullivan Jr. of Greensburg, the newly elected local NAACP branch president and a bishop of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in Pennsylvania. He was accompanied by his wife, the Rev. Sekinah Hamlin.

Making sure that breakfast ran smoothly wasAdrienne Russell, religious affairs chairwoman for the branch. Melinda McCoy was mistress of ceremonies.

Seen around the tables: Ruth Tolbert, Norma Skillings, the Rev. Carl Jones, Tamara Robinson, Sheila Morman, Dr.Robin Sims, Dorothy Skillings, Lurene Moore, Denise and Jeff Holmes, Yvonne and Stanley Taylor, Jerri Holts, Marilyn Fox Lewis, John V. Jones, Sharon Green, Dr. Janice Allen, Gertrude Allen, Corey Rogers, Jenna Howard and Westmoreland County Commissioner Ted Kopas.

— Shirley McMarlin

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