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Mother Nature seems to agree with Latrobe BPW's Spring Tea

| Sunday, March 10, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
(from left), Jackie Elliott, President, Latrobe BPW, Theresa Rusbosin, BPW District 3 Director, Cathy Caccia, BPW/PA State President, and Jean Calabrace, the 'Tea' Committee Chair, as well as, 'Woman of the Year', strike a pose, at the Latrobe Business & Professional Women's Club Spring Tea & Fashion Show, held at the Fred Rogers Center at Saint Vincent College in Unity Township on Saturday afternoon, March 9, 2013. Kim Stepinsky | For The Tribune-Review

It was quite felicitous that the Latrobe Business and Professional Women's Club Spring Tea and Fashion Show coincided with the first truly spring-like day of this still relatively new year.

More than 220 ladies gathered March 9 at the Fred Rogers Center at St. Vincent College, eager to pack away the winter clothes and see what's new in warm-weather wear.

After lunching at tables decorated in fun and festive themes by their table hostesses, they sat back for the parade of fashions from Christopher & Banks, C.J. Banks and Dress Barn, accentuated with accessories from Aw Else Boutique, Thirty One and Silpada. Jennifer Miele was emcee.

Event chairwomanJean Calabrace was pleasantly surprised to find that she had earned the honor of Latrobe BPW Woman of the Year, presented by chapter President Jackie Elliott for her outstanding service to the organization.

Special guest was Cathy Caccia of Greensburg, president of the Pennsylvania BPW.

Models included Elliott, Theresa Rusbosin, Kara Gaia, Madison Hantz, Amy Kerr, Cindy Strayer, Michelle Teague, Rae Ann Tronetti, Rebecca Zedrek, Sarah Zylka and Grace Henigin.

Also seen: Paula Maloney, Christina Sichi, April Henigin, Linda LeViere, Maureen Spitznogle, Lindsay Spitznogle, Michelle Zeni, Dana Marraccini, Connie Douglas, Tiffany McKlveen and Whitney Mullen.

— Shirley McMarlin

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