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Lincoln Highway's centennial celebrated

| Sunday, May 19, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
Kim Stepinsky | for the Tribune-Review
Lincoln Highway Heritage Corridor Executive Director Olga Herbert (from right) joins guests, Marianne and Ron Caruso of Penn Township for a photo in their 1955 Chevy BelAir convertable, during the Lincoln Highway Centennial Celebration, held at the Lincoln Highway Experience Museum in Unity Township. on Saturday evening, May 18, 2013.
Kim Stepinsky | for the Tribune-Review
Lincoln Highway Centennial Celebration planning committee members, (from left), Ann Nemanic, Anna Baird, Chris Tomsey and Mary Jo Bullington, gather around vintage cars, during the Lincoln Highway Centennial Celebration, held at the Lincoln Highway Experience Museum in Unity Township on Saturday evening, May 18, 2013.

It was 100 years of fun rolled into one evening, as a Lincoln Highway Centennial Celebration took place May 18 at the Lincoln Highway Experience museum in Unity.

Hosted by the Lincoln Highway Heritage Corridor, the event took a fond look back at the decades that have passed since the birth of this first transcontinental roadway, with a trivia contest and appropriate automobiles, music, costumes and even foods.

Among the classic and antique roadsters was the pristine 1935 Ford coupe of Bill and Karen Holtzer of Greensburg, whose rumble seat once ferried three grandchildren “screaming all the way” to Idlewild.

The buffet featured marinated mushrooms from the '20s; baked ham, scalloped potatoes and three-bean salad from the '40s; Shake 'n Bake chicken from the '60s; ambrosia salad from the '70s; and tabouleh and flavored coffee creamers from the new millenium. LHHC Executive Director Olga Herbert said she had to veto a Jello mold for fear it would melt in the warm weather.

The event was “more than sold out” with 155 attendees, said LHHC staffer Kristin Poerschke. Committee members were Mary Jo Bullington, Ann Nemanic, Anna Baird and Chris Tomsey.

Seen celebrating the Lincoln: Monty and Marlene Murty, Marge Logan, Denny Lang, Barbara Ferrier, Dick McKelvey, Clay Stoner, Phil and Gladys Light, Janet Burkardt, Art and Cheryl McMullen, Anthony Mistretta and Wendy Jones Mistretta, Kris Smith, Kary Coleman, Cheryl Wood, Barry and Karla Terney and Pat Kelm.

Also, Chick and Eleanor Cicconi, Jim and Cathy Koontz, Richard and Joanna Stillwagon, Bill and Pam Stablein, Bruce Robinson and Annie Urban, P.J. Zimmerlink and Tracy Rush and Michaela Milko, a 15-year-old Greater Latrobe Senior High School student, ceremoniously clad in her great-great-aunt's World War II WAC uniform.

— Shirley McMarlin

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