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Out & About: Westmoreland Museum of American Art's 'Wrecking Ball'

| Sunday, July 14, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
Kim Stepinsky | for the Tribune-Review
Artist, Terrel Crawford, of Mt. Washington, Allegheny County, designs a graffiti wall during the Westmoreland Museum of American Art Wrecking Ball, held in Greensburg on Saturday evening, July 13, 2013.
Kim Stepinsky | for the Tribune-Review
(from left), Jen and Rich Tinsman, of Greensburg, and Rebecca Sexton, of Greensburg, pose in front of a graffiti wall being spray painted by artist Brian McCall, of Greensburg, during the Westmoreland Museum of American Art Wrecking Ball, held in Greensburg on Saturday evening, July 13, 2013.
Kim Stepinsky | for the Tribune-Review
Westmoreland Museum of American Art Associate Director for Development and Finance, Amy Baldonieri, (left), and Westmoreland Museum of American Art Director/CEO, Judith Hansen O'Toole, are prepped with demo gear, at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art Wrecking Ball, held in Greensburg on Saturday evening, July 13, 2013.

The Westmoreland Museum of American Art, a Greensburg landmark for decades, is known for its extensive collection and fine exhibitions.

But on July 13, with graffiti, black lights, doors and windows flung open and walls whacked by sledgehammers, it was absent its usual polish.

“We're doing everything you're not supposed to do in a museum,” director and CEO Judy O'Toole said. “Let's just break loose and have some fun.”

More than 300 were expected to attend the Wrecking Ball, the final function to be held at the building as it closes for two years for expansion and renovation. Operations will continue at Westmoreland @rt 30, in the former Stickley, Audi & Co. furniture building in Unity.

O'Toole commended museum staff for their months of preparation for the move and for making the party a smashing success.

“We are very excited to be at this point,” she said. “It's the beginning of the future.”

O'Toole wore a hard hat and earrings dangling with tiny tools. Amy Baldonieri, associate director for development and finance, sported a tool belt and work boots and jeans. Ginnie Leiner, membership and development coordinator, fashioned a floppy bow for her hair from construction tape.

Seen: Tom and Susan Tanto, with their daughter, Jamie, Harley Trice, Terry Graft and Linda Brown, George and Nancy Stewart, Bud and Patti Gibbons, Rebecca Sexton, Brian McCall, Jim Bendel, Karl and Carmen Eisaman, Richard McCormick, Gene James, Rich and Jennifer Tinsman, Bob and Sharyn Sekora, Joanna Moyar, Linda Earnest and Margaret DiVirgilio.

— Dawn Law

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