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Art in the Kitchen...plus! tours Greensburg, Irwin homes

| Sunday, Oct. 6, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
Kim Stepinsky | for the Tribune-Review
Art in the Kitchen...Plus! co-chair, Amy Faith, (L), of Salem Township, joins Chef Seth Bailey, executive chef at the Cafe at the Frick at the Frick Art and Historical Center in Pittsburgh, during his cooking demonstration at the Westmoreland @rt 30, part of the 16th annual tasting tour held on Saturday, October 5, 2013.

Art in the Kitchen

Art in the Kitchen…plus! on Oct. 5 was a showcase of beautiful and innovative kitchen and outdoor party areas in the Greensburg and Irwin areas.

Those taking the tour got to sample recipes from the “Art in the Kitchen” cookbook.

The book is on sale at the Museum Shop at Westmoreland @rt 30 in Unity, temporary home — until 2015 — of the Westmoreland Museum of American Art.

The tour was organized by the Women's Committee of the Westmoreland and was sponsored by Excela Health, Seton Hill University and Smail Acura.

This year's tour featured the homes of Dr. Nicholas andMary Senuta, Pete and Patty Longdon, Ron andKathi Lenart, Joseph and Filippa Ponsi and Dr. Jason Cinti and Jennifer Miele.

Tour takers got to experience a behind-the-scenes look at the kitchen of chef Greg Andrews at the Supper Club at the Greensburg Train Station. Andrews' menu uses the freshest local foods the region has to offer.

At Westmoreland @rt 30, chef Seth Bailey of the Café at the Frick demonstrated how to make rice for sushi and salmon avocado and vegetarian rolls. Guests raved about a seaweed salad that accompanied the dishes.

Seen: Westmoreland CEO Judith O'Toole, with her mom,Betty Hansen, Nancy Jamison, Amy Faith, Aly Pegher, June Czarnecki, Machaela Pietrosza, Marilyn Overly, Kate Conti, Jean Eiseman and Jane McKenzie.

— Dawn Law

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