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Westmoreland Symphony's 'Home for the Holidays'

| Sunday, Dec. 22, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
Kim Stepinsky | for the Tribune-Review
(from left), Daniel Meyer, Artistic Director and Conductor, Westmoreland Symphony Orchestra, joins Jasmine Muhammad, soprano, and Michael Rozell, Director, All-Star Choir of Westmoreland County, at the Westmoreland Symphony Orchestra, Home for the Holdiays, held at The Palace Theatre in Greensburg on Saturday evening, December 21, 2013.

The Westmoreland Symphony Orchestra and the All-Star Choir of Westmoreland County presented the annual “Home for the Holidays” concert Dec. 22 in Greensburg's Palace Theatre.

Special guest was soprano Jasmine Muhammad, a second-year Pittsburgh Opera resident artist.

On the podium was the symphony's artistic director and conductor Daniel Meyer. New director of the choir is Michael Rozell, a longtime choral instructor in the Belle Vernon Area School District.

The program began, as usual, with lighthearted popular favorites such as “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas” and “Santa Claus Is Comin' to Town,” and progressed to the more solemn and sacred, including “Hanukkah Festival Overture,” Muhammed's solo “O Holy Night” and the “Hallelujah Chorus.”

Along the way was the audience-participation sing-along of familiar carols.

Seen at the symphony: Joy Carroll, Dr. David and Linda Assard, A.C. Dilliott, Ron Overdorff, Alan Shearer, Barbara Ferrier, Jim and Roxie Sumner, Russ and Laureen Schall, Dr. Jason Cinti and Jennifer Miele, Dr. George and Linda Assard, Dr. John and Dottie Ridinger, George Shaner and Michael Philopena.

As guests arrived, they were met by Rob Jessup of the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre, sharing the glad tidings that the ballet will return March 23 to Greensburg for a performance of “Sinatra & Swan Lake” at the Palace.

— Shirley McMarlin

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