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Pittsburgh Ballet's performance of 'Beauty' in Greensburg draws 800

| Sunday, March 22, 2015, 7:27 p.m.
(from left), PBT supporter, Sean Cassidy, of Monroeville, joins, Gabrielle Thurlow, dancer, Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre, Terrence S. Orr, Artistic Director, Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre, and Harris Ferris, Executive Director, Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre, at the reception following the annual Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre performance in Greensburg, 'Beauty & the Beast', held at the Palace Theatre in Greensburg on Friday evening, March 20, 2015.
Kim Stepinsky | for TRIB TOTAL MEDIA
(from left), PBT supporter, Sean Cassidy, of Monroeville, joins, Gabrielle Thurlow, dancer, Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre, Terrence S. Orr, Artistic Director, Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre, and Harris Ferris, Executive Director, Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre, at the reception following the annual Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre performance in Greensburg, 'Beauty & the Beast', held at the Palace Theatre in Greensburg on Friday evening, March 20, 2015.

Once upon a time (OK, it was March 20), the Palace Theatre stage was transformed into a fairy tale world inhabited by colorful, fantastical creatures.

The occasion was the fifth annual performance of the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre in its Greensburg outreach series, and the production was “Beauty and the Beast.” Set to a Tchaikovsky score, the tale featured a large cast dancing roles human, animal and mythical.

Stage set and costumes were purchased from the San Francisco Ballet, and the ballet's artistic director,Terrence Orr, actually danced in the original San Francisco production.

Attendance has increased each year that the ballet has visited Greensburg, said Rob Jessup, the ballet's manager of corporate relations. He estimated that there were about 800 in the audience, up from 500 in 2014.

Ballet reps and those attending a post-performance reception noted with pleasure the large number of children, both boys and girls, in the audience and how they sat in rapt attention through the entire show: more evidence that the classical arts are alive and well and will survive if they are appropriately nurtured.

Cast members includingGabrielle Thurlow (“Beauty”) and Luca Sbrizzi (“The Beast”) were easy to spot at the reception, as their lithe and graceful bodies glided effortlessly through the crowd of more ordinary humans.

Joining Orr and Jessup in representing the ballet were Executive DirectorHarris Ferris with Janet, along with Janet Popeleski and Janet Campbell with David.

Also seen: Sean Cassidy and Gina Sciarrino, Barbara Ferrier, Carol Demi, Pat Condo and Jan Taylor Condo, John and Karen Scanlan, Tony Marino, Eleanor Tornblom, Teresa Baughman, Jill Briercheck, Jo Ellen Numerick, Theresa Kappel, Jim and Mary Catherine Motchar, Kathy Raunikar, Bernard and Barbara Erlin, Jim and Kathy Bendel, Mark and Kim Parker, Lisa Ryan, Ernie and Georgia Teppert, Rae Ann Weaver and Melanie Plummer.

— Shirley McMarlin

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