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Teen is Heart Hero at Westmoreland and Indiana Heart Ball

Dawn Law
| Sunday, March 29, 2015, 8:10 p.m.

A spectacular view of the ridges of the Laurel Highlands was the backdrop for the 2015 Westmoreland and Indiana Heart Ball March 28 at Chestnut Ridge Golf Resort and Conference Center, near Blairsville.

The benefit for the American Heart Association celebrates lives saved through research and medical advances backed by AHA.

This year's Heart Hero was 17-year-old Lance Frye, who went into cardiac arrest twice after having surgery when he was just a week old.

Frye's diagnosis of hypoplastic left heart syndrome was diagnosed before he was born, and the procedure that saved his life was performed by the medical staff of Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC.

Lance, the son of Wilbur and Betsy Frye, has served as ambassador, spokesperson and fundraiser for AHA for much of his life.

The evening began with a reception, followed by dinner and a live auction with the incomparable Kathy Svilar.

Music for dancing into the night was by Mercedez.

Upcoming opportunities to help fund research and education in AHA's fight against heart disease and stroke: the first annual AHA Golf Outing July 20 at Ligonier Country Club, and the Westmoreland and Indiana Counties Heart Walk Aug. 29 at the Kennametal Fitness Trail in Unity.

Those interested in opportunities to become an AHA volunteer should call Deanna Zdinak at 724-519-8646.

Seen: Rich and Patty DeBone, Dr. Larry and Bonnie DeNino, Robin Ryan, Donald and Linda Linville, Bruce Bush, Bernie Bandini and Sue McFarland Bandini, Jennifer Miele, Doug Bailey and Jan Butcher, Tom and Karen Kohut, Mike and Jennifer Giunta, Lisa Frederick, Jeff Poole and Becky Crea, Art and Cheryl McMullen, Kevin Miscik, Bob Kocian, Paul and Diane Nickoloff, Todd and Trisha McMillen and Mike and Denise Lordi.

— Dawn Law

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