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Peace, tranquility still reign on Jekyll Island

| Friday, Dec. 8, 2017, 8:57 p.m.
Driftwood Beach, Jekyll Island, Ga.
Lucy Byers
Driftwood Beach, Jekyll Island, Ga.
Bike trail around Jekyll Island, Ga.
Lucy Byers
Bike trail around Jekyll Island, Ga.
Take a carriage ride around Jekyll Island, Ga.
Lucy Byers
Take a carriage ride around Jekyll Island, Ga.
Jekyll Island Golf Club
Lucy Byers
Jekyll Island Golf Club
A 'cottage' on Jekyll Island, Ga.
Lucy Byers
A 'cottage' on Jekyll Island, Ga.

Turn back the hands of time to experience the place to vacation on an island away from the world. Those looking for a place away from the hustle and bustle of daily living would enjoy visiting Jekyll Island, Ga.

It's a place that is quiet and remains somewhat undeveloped. There are no chain restaurants; the only restaurants are privately owned. We stayed at oceanfront, viewing the beautiful sunrises and sunsets daily.

Jekyll Island is one of the Golden Isles located off the coast of Georgia, approximately 95 miles south of Savannah. It is one of the four Georgia barrier islands.

After the cold winter, we were excited to vacation in April with sun and blue skies and average 82 degrees days. A once per day toll is charged to access the private island.

What to do? Visitors can take a carriage ride, walk along the 10 miles of beaches, bike the trails, see the wildlife, play a game of miniature golf or splash at the water park.

For the history buffs, try a tour and learn of the early generations of the Rockefellers and Vanderbilts.

In the midsection of the island lies the historic district. This includes the buildings around the Jekyll Island Golf Club, a two-winged structure that contains numerous suites for rental.

There are 33 buildings dating from the late 19th and early 20th centuries that surround the hotel, referred to as “cottages.” They were built by the rich and famous.

The cottages are elaborate and are bigger than most of our homes. The island plan was to market the island as a winter retreat. The rich would spend only a few months in the winter there and leave the island for their main residence leaving the cottages vacant.

We toured parts of Jekyll Island Golf Club with lunch in the dining room, which was elegant. It felt like we were taking a step back in time. We were told that sometime this year that the golf club may be closed to the public.

Touring the Sea Turtle Center was quite interesting. We learned about the endangered turtles and watched rehabilitation in action.

To protect the sea turtles, nighttime on the island is quite dark, outside lighting is dim so as not to disturb the sea turtles and other wildlife. This was a little challenging for we are used to having bright lights for safety's sake. We were told that the island is very safe with no crime rate.

The beaches are a perfect place to relax and are unlike other beaches. One of the beaches that is worth visiting is Driftwood Beach that is located on the northern end of the island.

This beach will amaze you with the gorgeous driftwood and trees all along the shoreline. Driftwood Beach is a wonderful place for a wedding and a place to capture magnificent photographs.

While on the beach, you might want to visit Driftwood Beach Bistro restaurant. This is a neat place to eat — offering stuffed flounder, wild Georgia shrimp, bistro grills and more home-cooked delicious Georgian meals

Lucy Byers is a Latrobe resident.

Have a vacation tale? We'd love to hear about it. Send your story and pictures to tribliving@tribweb.com.

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