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Norwegian Bliss shows off go-karts, laser tag, water slide

| Tuesday, May 8, 2018, 10:01 a.m.
This May 4, 2018 photo released by Norwegian Cruise Line shows their newest ship, Norwegian Bliss in New York for a preview event.
Charles Sykes/AP
This May 4, 2018 photo released by Norwegian Cruise Line shows their newest ship, Norwegian Bliss in New York for a preview event.
Norwegian Cruise Line has a race course for electric go-karts aboard their newest ship, Norwegian Bliss in New York.
Charles Sykes/AP
Norwegian Cruise Line has a race course for electric go-karts aboard their newest ship, Norwegian Bliss in New York.
Norwegian Cruise Line shows their newest ship, Norwegian Bliss in New York for a preview event. The ship’s features include a race course for electric go-karts, laser tag, a waterslide with a tube that swooshes you along the side of the ship and an observation lounge for enjoying Alaska scenery.
Charles Sykes/AP
Norwegian Cruise Line shows their newest ship, Norwegian Bliss in New York for a preview event. The ship’s features include a race course for electric go-karts, laser tag, a waterslide with a tube that swooshes you along the side of the ship and an observation lounge for enjoying Alaska scenery.
Norwegian Cruise Line's newest ship, Norwegian Bliss features a waterslide with a tube that swooshes you along the side of the ship.
Charles Sykes/AP
Norwegian Cruise Line's newest ship, Norwegian Bliss features a waterslide with a tube that swooshes you along the side of the ship.
Norwegian Cruise Line features a restaurant called Jimmy Buffet’s Margaritaville At Sea aboard their newest ship Norwegian Bliss.
Charles Sykes/AP
Norwegian Cruise Line features a restaurant called Jimmy Buffet’s Margaritaville At Sea aboard their newest ship Norwegian Bliss.

NEW YORK — Norwegian Cruise Line's newest ship, Norwegian Bliss, has begun its U.S. inaugural tour with stops in New York, Miami and Los Angeles before a christening in Seattle kicking off a season of cruises to Alaska.

The ship's seven-day cruises to Alaska begin in June and will include one port call in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.

The ship's features include a two-level race course for electric go-karts, laser tag, a waterslide tube that swooshes you along the side of the ship and an observation lounge for enjoying Alaskan scenery.

It's also got a mojito bar, cigar lounge, brew house, Jimmy Buffet's Margaritaville At Sea and Q Smokehouse, a Texas barbecue restaurant.

As it repositions from the Atlantic to the Pacific, it will become one of the largest ships to ever navigate the Panama Canal. Norwegian Bliss measures 135 feet wide by 1,093 feet long, while the canal is 164 feet wide and 1,312 feet long.

Norwegian Bliss is the largest ship in Norwegian's fleet, with 20 decks and a capacity of about 4,000 passengers.

As cruise ships go, however, at least a half-dozen other ships are larger. Royal Caribbean's Symphony of the Seas, which also set sail this spring, is the world's largest, with a passenger capacity of 6,680.

The hull of Norwegian Bliss features images of whales and other sea creatures designed by the artist Wyland, who is known for his depictions of marine life.

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