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Travel briefs: Man wins 'Disneyland' lawsuit

| Saturday, March 30, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

Man wins lawsuit after ride breakdown

An attorney says a disabled man was awarded $8,000 by Disneyland after the “It's a Small World” ride broke, stranding him for a half hour while the theme song played continuously.

Lawyer David Geffen says Jose Martinez didn't medically stabilize for three hours after the ride broke down in 2009.

Disneyland spokeswoman Suzi Brown said the Anaheim theme park believes it provided appropriate assistance during the incident and is disappointed that the court did not fully agree.

Geffen says Martinez uses a wheelchair, suffers from panic attacks and high blood pressure, which was aggravated by a need to urinate.

Geffen says half the award ordered is for pain and suffering, and the rest is for a violation of disability law. Brown says the violation has been addressed.

Civil War Trust out with Va. Battle App

The Civil War Trust is rolling out its latest in a series of Battle Apps for smartphones. The Appomattox Battle App culminates with the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia on April 9, 1865. The nation's largest nonprofit battlefield preservation organization says more than 110,000 users have downloaded the 10 titles. The apps are intended to enhance a visitor's experience at Civil War sites. They include GPS-enabled maps for self-guided tours, chronologies, facts pages and trivia challenges.

Forest restricts bikers

New restrictions are being implemented for mountain bikers in parts of the Coconino National Forest near Sedona, Ariz.

The Forest Service says the restrictions in the Red Rock Ranger District prohibit mountain bikers from leaving official trails and traveling cross country in specific areas. Those areas include Schnebly Hill, Cathedral Rock, Schuerman Mountain, Carroll Mountain and Airport.

The Forest Service says the restrictions result from erosion and other damage from authorized and unplanned trails used by mountain bikers.

According to the Forest Service, more than 170 miles of official trails remain open to mountain biking.

— Wire reports

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