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Pitt med school students learn residency assignments as part of Match Day

| Friday, March 17, 2017, 2:51 p.m.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Alexis Chidi, 27, of the South Side celebrates with fellow medical students after finding out she was assigned to Johns Hopkins for her residency on the annual Match Day on Friday, March 17, 2017, at Petersen Events Center in Oakland. Match Day is a national event where the majority of medical students across the country receive their residency assignments through the National Resident Matching Program, a private, not-for-profit organization that places graduating students in residency programs throughout the United States.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Kishan Thadikonda, 26, and Alyssa Bruehlman 28, both of East Liberty celebrates after the engaged couple found out they were both assigned to the University of Wisconsin for their residency on the annual Match Day on Friday, March 17, 2017, at Petersen Events Center in Oakland. Match Day is a national event where the majority of medical students across the country receive their residency assignments through the National Resident Matching Program, a private, not-for-profit organization that places graduating students in residency programs throughout the United States.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Pitt Medical Students, Eva Maria Urrechaga (far left) and Anisleidy Fombona (far right) celebrate with Patricia Castillo of Shadyside on the annual Match Day on Friday, March 17, 2017, at Petersen Events Center in Oakland. Match Day is a national event where the majority of medical students across the country receive their residency assignments through the National Resident Matching Program, a private, not-for-profit organization that places graduating students in residency programs throughout the United States.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Emily Smith, 26, of Point Breeze nervously hugs her husband, A.J. Smith, 28, before opening her envelope for the annual Match Day on Friday, March 17, 2017, at Petersen Events Center in Oakland. Match Day is a national event where the majority of medical students across the country receive their residency assignments through the National Resident Matching Program, a private, not-for-profit organization that places graduating students in residency programs throughout the United States.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Mohini Dasari, 25, of Squirrel Hill celebrates after finding out she was assigned to the University of Washington in Seattle for her residency on the annual Match Day on Friday, March 17, 2017, at Petersen Events Center in Oakland. Match Day is a national event where the majority of medical students across the country receive their residency assignments through the National Resident Matching Program, a private, not-for-profit organization that places graduating students in residency programs throughout the United States.

The envelopes, please!

On Friday, 156 University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine students received news about their placement at various residency programs.

They simultaneously opened envelopes to cheers, hugs and tears at noon during a ceremony at the Petersen Events Center. Each envelope contained a sheet of paper that informed the students about the location of their residency training — a pivotal step in their medical careers.

The event, which unfolded nationally, is known as Match Day.

“This is an incredibly joyful day,” Joan Harvey, associate dean of student affairs at Pitt's School of Medicine, told the future doctors. “In so many ways, this is the culmination of all your hard work.”

On Tuesday, the Trib will profile four future doctors from Pitt in its HealthNow section.

Ben Schmitt is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at bschmitt@tribweb.com.

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