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Pittsburgh to spend $580K on 'smart' garbage can technology

Bob Bauder
| Tuesday, May 2, 2017, 4:54 p.m.
A Victor Stanley Co. trash can.
Victor Stanley Co.
A Victor Stanley Co. trash can.

Pittsburgh is getting “smart” garbage cans.

City Council on Tuesday approved the purchase of software necessary for garbage cans that have sensors to gauge garbage volume and send a wireless signal when they're full.

Department of Public Works Director Mike Gable two weeks ago proposed the $580,000 purchase of software and 400 to 500 new garbage cans. He said the technology would drastically cut back on the 100,000 hours employees spend each year checking 1,200 garbage cans across the city to see whether they need to be emptied.

Council approved the purchase by a 5-2 vote, with Councilwomen Theresa Kail-Smith of Westwood and Darlene Harris of Spring Hill voting against the measure. Smith said her constituents overwhelmingly opposed the idea, and Harris objected to the cost.

Gable said he hopes to have the cans working by summer.

Council also confirmed three new board members nominated by Mayor Bill Peduto last month to the Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority.

They are Debbie Lestitian, Chaton Turner and Jim Turner. Lestitian is Peduto's chief administrative officer and heads the city personnel department. Chaton Turner is an attorney. Jim Turner is a retired University of Pittsburgh professor.

They replace Alex Thomson, Caren Glotfelty and Andrea Geraghty, who all resigned the same week in March from PWSA's board.

Bob Bauder is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 412-765-2312, bbauder@tribweb.com or via Twitter at @bobbauder.

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