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Attorney challenges Woodland Hills school officials to charity boxing match

Ben Schmitt
| Wednesday, May 3, 2017, 2:00 p.m.
Attorney Todd Hollis speaks to the press about his client, Queshawn Wade, a 14-year-old student at Woodland Hills High School, on Wednesday, April 5, 2017. Wade was involved in an altercation with a school resource officer on Monday.
Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Attorney Todd Hollis speaks to the press about his client, Queshawn Wade, a 14-year-old student at Woodland Hills High School, on Wednesday, April 5, 2017. Wade was involved in an altercation with a school resource officer on Monday.
Pittsburgh attorney Todd Hollis released a video to the media from March 3, 2015, that shows an incident inside Woodland Hills High School student involving a then-14-year-old student and Churchill Police Officer Steve Shaulis and Principal Kevin Murray.
Pittsburgh attorney Todd Hollis released a video to the media from March 3, 2015, that shows an incident inside Woodland Hills High School student involving a then-14-year-old student and Churchill Police Officer Steve Shaulis and Principal Kevin Murray.

Woodland Hills Schools Superintendent Alan Johnson said he's disappointed by a Facebook post in which Pittsburgh attorney Todd Hollis challenged Johnson, a Churchill police officer and a high school principal to a boxing match.

The post said, "CHALLENGE: Kevin Murray. Stephen Shaulis or Alan Johnson. If any one of you want to do a charity grudge BOXING match. Get in touch. I'm tired of watching you BEAT up on kids. Please Share, share and share again. #letsdoit #fightingforyouiswhatido #bullys."

Murray is the principal at Woodland Hills High School and Shaulis is a police officer, who was assigned to the high school.

"I am deeply disappointed that Mr. Hollis has sunk to this level," Johnson said in an email. "He is a professional attorney representing the interests of his clients or so I would hope. This kind of chicanery is not consistent with good legal representation. It doesn't merit any further comment."

The school district is embroiled in a dispute with Hollis surrounding controversial videos he released this week that show altercations between Shaulis and two high school students. The incidents, captured separately by school surveillance cameras, took place on April 3 and on March 3, 2015.

Phil DiLucente, an attorney who represents Shaulis and Murray, echoed Johnson's reaction to the Facebook post.

"I am disappointed by the most recent social media post made by Mr. Hollis regarding two of my clients," he said. "I would caution any further untruths being spoken or written in public regarding my clients, Mr. Murray or Officer Shaulis."

DiLucente said it is untrue "that my clients beat up kids. He capitalized BEAT," referring to Hollis.

Hollis stood by his post.

"As it relates to Mr. DiLucente's cautionary suggestion — his clients and their actions are a matter of video record," Hollis said. "The videos speak for themselves. To the extent that his clients are bothered by what the videos show is not my concern."

Hollis said he'd be happy to meet them in the ring.

"Furthermore, if they are too bothered they are certainly able to take me up on my prior offer to do a benefit boxing match and they can address their issues with me in the ring," he said.

Hollis said he has no boxing experience.

Ben Schmitt is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 412-320-7991, bschmitt@tribweb.com or via Twitter at @Bencschmitt.

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