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Wings Over Pittsburgh airshow returns to thrill onlookers

| Saturday, May 13, 2017, 5:30 p.m.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Fritz Sweeney of Wheeling lifts up his son, Christian, 4, to see into the cockpit of a T-38 at the Wings Over Pittsburgh Air Show at the 911th Airlift Wing in Moon on Saturday, May 13, 2017.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Clayton Krause, 7, of Murrysville, throws a balsa-wood glider into the air at the Wings Over Pittsburgh Air Show at the 911th Airlift Wing in Moon on Saturday, May 13, 2017.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Navy Ensign David Miles of Pensacola, Fla., stands on the wing of a T-6 bravo at the Wings Over Pittsburgh Air Show at the 911th Airlift Wing in Moon on Saturday, May 13, 2017.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Makenna Price, 3, of Belle Vernon sits on her father Joshua's shoulders as Sean D. Tucker flies his stunt plane for Team Oracle at the Wings Over Pittsburgh Air Show at the 911th Airlift Wing in Moon on Saturday, May 13, 2017.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Kylee Szost, 5, of Moon plays with a toy jet in front of a T-6B at the Wings Over Pittsburgh Air Show at the 911th Airlift Wing in Moon on Saturday, May 13, 2017.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Gavin Draskovich, 5, of Cranberry climbs onto a P-51 fighter that was flown by the Tuskegee Airman during World War II with a little help from Bill Shepard of Commemorative Air Force at the Wings Over Pittsburgh Air Show at the 911th Airlift Wing in Moon on Saturday, May 13, 2017.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Landon Luhowiak, 3, of Ben Avon gets help with a flight helmet at the Wings Over Pittsburgh Air Show at the 911th Airlift Wing in Moon on Saturday, May 13, 2017.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
The hat of Steven Orvis, 26, of East Brady is silhouetted as he walks through the belly of a cargo plane at the Wings Over Pittsburgh Air Show at the 911th Airlift Wing in Moon on Saturday, May 13, 2017.

Thousands of people packed the 911th Airlift Wing in Moon for Wings Over Pittsburgh on Saturday after a six-year hiatus.

The event, free to the public, offered ground exhibits, including vintage and current military aircraft and thrilling aerial exhibitions by stunt pilots.

Spectators lined up to see the inside of a KC-135 Stratotanker, the interior of a Fed-Ex cargo plane or the cockpit of a P-51 Mustang that was flown by the famous Tuskegee airmen. Others gathered on the grass next to the runway to see air demonstrations by the United States Air Force Thunderbirds, aerobatic pilot Sean Tucker with Team Oracle, GEICO Skytypers Airshow Team or the Air Combat Command F-22 Demonstration Team.

For Cole Draskovich, 7, of Cranberry, the noisier, the better.

“We've seen tons of cool stuff like skydivers and planes that make big circles in the sky, but I really liked the big, loud jets,” Draskovich said.

Andrew Russell is a Tribune-Review staff writer.

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