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Verona Community Day has grown 'big-time'

Tawnya Panizzi
| Sunday, Aug. 13, 2017, 4:54 p.m.
George Sears, manager of the Verona Giant Eagle, spent the day in the dunk tank to raise money for the borough's Chamber of Commerce during Community Day on Sunday, Aug. 13, 2017.
Tawnya Panizzi | Tribune-Review
George Sears, manager of the Verona Giant Eagle, spent the day in the dunk tank to raise money for the borough's Chamber of Commerce during Community Day on Sunday, Aug. 13, 2017.
Verona Community Day organizer Patti Tumminello admires the items for sale during the festival on Sunday, Aug. 13, 2017.
Tawnya Panizzi | Tribune-Review
Verona Community Day organizer Patti Tumminello admires the items for sale during the festival on Sunday, Aug. 13, 2017.
Band members of American Pie tune their instruments before a set at Verona Community Day on Sunday, Aug. 13, 2017. For more on the band, visit americanpieoldies.com.
Tawnya Panizzi | Tribune-Review
Band members of American Pie tune their instruments before a set at Verona Community Day on Sunday, Aug. 13, 2017. For more on the band, visit americanpieoldies.com.

George Sears spent the better part of Sunday afternoon being underwater after getting dunked, but it was all for a good cause.

Sears, manager of the Verona Giant Eagle, volunteered to be the target of the dunk tank at the borough's second annual Community Day at Railroad Park.

“Give it your best shot,” Sears shouted to a child tossing balls at the target.

The community festival attracted about 300 people to the park along the Allegheny River and featured food trucks, craft vendors and games.

“It has grown big-time since last year,” organizer Patti Tumminello said.

Tumminello, chair of the Chamber of Commerce Concert in the Parks committee, coordinated the celebration with fellow members Maryann Yingling and Shirley Davis.

Proceeds benefit the Chamber of Commerce , which supports borough activities like egg hunts, farm markets and a car cruise.

“The food is fantastic and everyone loves the music,” Tumminello said.

Entertainment was provided throughout the day by dancing troupe the North Star Kids, DJ Leo Bickert and oldies band American Pie.

Vendor Starr Thomas, a Penn Hills resident, brought her boutique bows and baby designs to the fair for the second year.

“I enjoy being here,” Thomas said. “It's a great day.”

Tawnya Panizzi is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 412-782-2121, ext. 2, tpanizzi@tribweb.com or via Twitter @tawnyatrib.

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