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Eclipse headquarters: Everything you need to know

Aaron Aupperlee
| Sunday, Aug. 20, 2017, 7:56 p.m.
Raymond Harper, from Greensburg, poses at the Delmont Public Library on Saturday, Aug. 12, 2017, with glasses that make it safe to watch the upcoming total solar eclipse.
Kyle Hodges
Raymond Harper, from Greensburg, poses at the Delmont Public Library on Saturday, Aug. 12, 2017, with glasses that make it safe to watch the upcoming total solar eclipse.
St. Vincent College physics associate professor John Smetanka invites area residents to witness the Aug. 21 partial solar eclipse in front of the Sis and Herman Dupre Science Pavilion on campus.
St. Vincent College
St. Vincent College physics associate professor John Smetanka invites area residents to witness the Aug. 21 partial solar eclipse in front of the Sis and Herman Dupre Science Pavilion on campus.
This is a photo of full solar eclipse.
This is a photo of full solar eclipse.
Tribune-Review reoprter Aaron Aupperlee demonstrating the wonder of solar glasses on Wednesday, Aug. 16, 2017, in front of the Allegheny Obervatory at Riverview Park. This is a screen capture from a video the Tribune-Review made to share information about the upcoming eclipse.
Tribune-Review reoprter Aaron Aupperlee demonstrating the wonder of solar glasses on Wednesday, Aug. 16, 2017, in front of the Allegheny Obervatory at Riverview Park. This is a screen capture from a video the Tribune-Review made to share information about the upcoming eclipse.
A visitor puts a pin on map to show where she is visiting from during the Wyoming Eclipse Festival on August 20, 2017 in Casper, Wyoming. Thouands of people have descended on Casper, Wyoming to see the solar eclipse in the path of totality as it passes over the state on August 21.
Getty Images
A visitor puts a pin on map to show where she is visiting from during the Wyoming Eclipse Festival on August 20, 2017 in Casper, Wyoming. Thouands of people have descended on Casper, Wyoming to see the solar eclipse in the path of totality as it passes over the state on August 21.
Ashley Ann Sander, left, and Alexandra Dowling hawk solar eclipse glasses for $10 a pair on the side of the road to tourists approaching Clayton, Ga., Sunday, Aug. 20, 2017. Clayton is in the path of totality in North Georgia.
Ashley Ann Sander, left, and Alexandra Dowling hawk solar eclipse glasses for $10 a pair on the side of the road to tourists approaching Clayton, Ga., Sunday, Aug. 20, 2017. Clayton is in the path of totality in North Georgia.

Millions of Americans will look to the sky Monday to catch a glimpse of the solar eclipse.

Portions of the country — an arc from Oregon to South Carolina — will get to see a total solar eclipse when the moon completely blocks the sun.

Western Pennsylvania will see about 80 percent of the sun blocked by the moon when the solar eclipse peaks here around 2:35 p.m.

Stay with TribLIVE throughout the day Monday for the latest photos, videos and news from around the country and eclipse watch parties in your community.

And before the eclipse, brush up on safety tips, science and stories from around the region right here at TribLIVE.com.

ESSENTIALS

■ WHAT'S SO SPECIAL ABOUT THIS ECLIPSE?

What's a total solar eclipse and why this one is so unusual
Total solar eclipses occur every year or two or three, often in the middle of nowhere like the South Pacific or Antarctic. What makes the Aug. 21 eclipse so special is that it will cut diagonally across the entire United States. More .

■ WANT TO KNOW MORE?

Everything you need to know about the solar eclipse
Video of Tribune-Review staff writer Aaron Aupperlee gives you a primer of what to expect Monday during the solar eclipse. More .

■ TOO LATE FOR SAFETY GLASSES?

Bona fide eclipse safety glasses hard to come by in Alle-Kiski Valley
If you're thinking about buying safety glasses in the Alle-Kiski Valley for Monday's solar eclipse, you are probably too late. More .

■ SAFETY TIPS AND VIEWING PARTIES

Double-check your safety measures amid solar eclipse mania
You've ordered your eclipse glasses and made your pinhole viewer. All that's left to do is RSVP to a local watch party for the Aug. 21 solar eclipse. But are you sure you are completely safe? Better double-check. More .

■ SPARKING CURIOSITY AND DIY CAMERAS

Solar eclipse excellent time to spark a lifetime of curiosity
Space is a good place to dream, to think about the impossible. It wasn't too long ago people looked at the stars and the moon and wondered if we'd ever go there. More .


KIDS

■ SAFETY CONCERNS

Pennsylvania issues solar eclipse warning for children
Parents and caregivers should remember to protect those little eyes when the partial solar eclipse swings through Pennsylvania on Monday. More .

■ EARLY DISMISSAL

Carlynton to dismiss early Monday due to solar eclipse
Carlynton School District will operate its first day of class with an early dismissal due to the solar eclipse. More .

■ CARNEGIE 5th GRADE CLASSES WILL WATCH FROM OUTSIDE

Carnegie Elementary fifth graders to head outside for solar eclipse
Fifth graders at Carnegie Elementary will head outside on their first day of class to watch science in action. More .


WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING?

■ PITT SHADOW BANDITS TO GET SKY-HIGH VIEW OF ECLIPSE

Pitt Shadow Bandits ready to launch balloon during solar eclipse
A group of University of Pittsburgh students, faculty and staff is ready for an up-close and personal look at the total solar eclipse — and shadow bands — next week. More .

■ BONNIE TYLER TO SING 'TOTAL ECLIPSE' ABOARD CRUISE SHIP

Bonnie Tyler to sing 'Total Eclipse' hit during eclipse
Some cruise passengers will have the ultimate soundtrack for Monday's solar eclipse when Bonnie Tyler sings her hit "Total Eclipse of the Heart" on board. More .

■ PA. FAMILY HEADED TO TENN. FOR 'OPTIMUM VIEW' OF ECLIPSE

Eclipse chasers head south for best view
A 16-hour round trip for a two-minute experience is not too high a price to pay for Western Pennsylvanians who want to see Monday's solar eclipse in all its totality. More .

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