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Fallen Canonsburg Officer Scott Bashioum is up for rare honor

Jeremy Boren
| Friday, Sept. 8, 2017, 4:24 p.m.
The flag flies at half staff at the Canonsburg Borough Building in memory of Canonsburg Police Officer, Scott Leslie Bashioum, 52, of Washington, who was shot earlier in the day, Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
The flag flies at half staff at the Canonsburg Borough Building in memory of Canonsburg Police Officer, Scott Leslie Bashioum, 52, of Washington, who was shot earlier in the day, Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016.
Canonsburg Police Department posted this photo to Facebook on Tuesday of Officer Scott Bashioum. Bashioum was participating in a National Prescription Drug Take Back Day event in October at the Canonsburg Shop 'n Save.
Canonsburg Police Department
Canonsburg Police Department posted this photo to Facebook on Tuesday of Officer Scott Bashioum. Bashioum was participating in a National Prescription Drug Take Back Day event in October at the Canonsburg Shop 'n Save.

If Congress approves a bill to name the Canonsburg Post Office building on West Pike Street after former borough police Officer Scott Bashioum, he will be only the second police officer killed in the line of duty to be given that honor in Pennsylvania.

A gunman shot and killed Bashioum, 52, in November. Bashioum and another officer, who was shot but survived, were responding to a report of domestic violence when they were ambushed . The gunman, Michael Cwiklinski, also killed Dalia Sabae. The two were married but estranged. Cwiklinski committed suicide.

Bashioum's brother, Michael Bashioum, asked U.S. Rep. Tim Murphy, R-Upper St. Clair, to introduce legislation to name Canonsburg's post office for the fallen officer.

"It's huge," Mike Bashioum told the Washington Observer-Reporter in April . "His name will be on that building forever and everyone will know who he was."

On Friday, Murphy's office said the House Committee on Oversight & Government Reform will consider the legislation next week. From there, it could go to the full House for consideration.

Out of more than 1,600 post offices in Pennsylvania, Congress has passed legislation to name 37 for an individual.

Most of them honor state legislators, mayors, former postmasters, council members and other politicians.

A few bear the names of U.S. military service members killed in World War II, the Vietnam War, Somalia and Iraq, including Specialist Ross A. McGinnis, the most recent honoree. He was killed in Iraq in 2006 and "posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for sacrificing his life to save his comrades," according to an online database of Post Office names. The Post Office building in Knox, Clarion County, was named for McGinnis in 2016.

Indiana's Post Office is named for actor Jimmy Stewart, who was born in the Pennsylvania town. Freedom's post office honors John Challis, the Beaver County teenager who served as an inspiration to other young people dealing with a cancer diagnosis. Challis died in 2008.

Only one post office, on Dock Street in Pittston, Luzerne County, is named for a police officer: State Trooper Joshua D. Miller, a "Pennsylvania State trooper killed in the line of duty in 2009 while helping rescue a child from an armed kidnapper," the U.S. Postal Service database said.

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