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Coal train derails, railcars roll over in McKeesport

| Wednesday, Sept. 27, 2017, 1:12 p.m.
Several cars carrying coal derailed in downtown McKeesport Wednesday afternoon, Sept. 27, 2017.
WPXI
Several cars carrying coal derailed in downtown McKeesport Wednesday afternoon, Sept. 27, 2017.
Several cars carrying coal derailed in downtown McKeesport Wednesday afternoon, Sept. 27, 2017.
WPXI
Several cars carrying coal derailed in downtown McKeesport Wednesday afternoon, Sept. 27, 2017.
Several cars carrying coal derailed in downtown McKeesport Wednesday afternoon, Sept. 27, 2017.
WPXI
Several cars carrying coal derailed in downtown McKeesport Wednesday afternoon, Sept. 27, 2017.

A CSX Transportation train derailment Wednesday afternoon in McKeesport dumped coal, tore down electrical wires and closed a main rail line.

About a dozen railcars left the tracks and several rolled over just before 12:30 p.m. off the 200 block of Lysle Boulevard, behind McKeesport City Hall. The derailment took down several electrical wires, which Duquesne Light crews repaired.

No injuries were reported.

CSX spokesman Rob Doolittle said company personnel on the scene are assessing the situation and developing a plan to rerail the 10 to 12 cars. CSX contractors have brought heavy equipment to the scene to rerail the cars, clean up the spilled coal and repair any damage to the tracks.

He said it's too early to provide a time estimate for the cleanup.

The cause of the incident is under investigation, he said.

He said CSX shares the rail line with Amtrak.

Amtrak spokesman Marc Magliari said he hopes a track will be open Wednesday night for the Washington-to-Pittsburgh train, scheduled to arrive in Pittsburgh just before midnight. If not, the nightly run will be detoured around the wreck.

“We'll be coming to Pittsburgh tonight,” Magliari said.

Doolittle said the train — two locomotives and 126 cars carrying coal — was traveling from Grafton, W.Va., to Monaca in Beaver County when the derailment occurred.

“CSX appreciates the quick response of area first responders to the scene of the incident and their assistance in protecting the public as we work to assess the situation and recover from the derailment,” Doolittle said.

An CSX oil train derailed in June 2014 on the other side of the rail bridge over the Youghiogheny River, a few hundred yards from Wednesday's incident.

Jeff Domenick is an assistant news editor for the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review.

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