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Southwest announces nonstop flight from Pittsburgh to Cancun

Aaron Aupperlee
| Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017, 10:54 a.m.
OAKLAND, CA - FEBRUARY 24:  Swissport employee Christopher Gonzalez pulls a fuel line as he prepares to refuel a Southwest Airlines plane at the Oakland International Airport on February 24, 2011 in Oakland, California.  In an effort to keep up with rapidly rising oil prices, airlines are increasing fares at a faster pace than last year and have also increased some of their fees, tacked on peak-time surcharges and are adding fuel surcharges on international flights.  (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images) *** Local Caption *** Christopher Gonzalez
Getty Images
OAKLAND, CA - FEBRUARY 24: Swissport employee Christopher Gonzalez pulls a fuel line as he prepares to refuel a Southwest Airlines plane at the Oakland International Airport on February 24, 2011 in Oakland, California. In an effort to keep up with rapidly rising oil prices, airlines are increasing fares at a faster pace than last year and have also increased some of their fees, tacked on peak-time surcharges and are adding fuel surcharges on international flights. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images) *** Local Caption *** Christopher Gonzalez
OAKLAND, CA - FEBRUARY 24:  Swissport employee Miroslaw Kaczorowski prepares to refuel a Southwest Airlines plane at the Oakland International Airport on February 24, 2011 in Oakland, California.  In an effort to keep up with rapidly rising oil prices, airlines are increasing fares at a faster pace than last year and have also increased some of their fees, tacked on peak-time surcharges and are adding fuel surcharges on international flights.  (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Getty Images
OAKLAND, CA - FEBRUARY 24: Swissport employee Miroslaw Kaczorowski prepares to refuel a Southwest Airlines plane at the Oakland International Airport on February 24, 2011 in Oakland, California. In an effort to keep up with rapidly rising oil prices, airlines are increasing fares at a faster pace than last year and have also increased some of their fees, tacked on peak-time surcharges and are adding fuel surcharges on international flights. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Access to beaches, sunshine, resorts and margaritas in Cancun, Mexico, from Western Pennsylvania will get a little easier this summer.

Southwest Airlines announced Tuesday that it is adding a direct flight from Pittsburgh International Airport to Cancun International Airport starting in June.

The seasonal flight will fly between the two airports on Saturdays. The first flight is scheduled for June 9, pending government approvals.

A round-trip flight will cost $440.31 with Southwest's least expensive fare option, according to the airline's website. Flights are currently available in June, July and August.

Southwest said it added a Pittsburgh flight because of growing demand for nonstop routes to Cancun. The airline also added a nonstop flight to Cancun from Raleigh-Durham International Airport in North Carolina.

Delta, American, Apple Vacations and Vacation Express already offer seasonal service to Cancun. Delta flies once a week from May to August. American flies once a week from February to August. Apple Vacations offers three flights a week on Allegiant from January to November. Vacation Express flies once a week from May to August on VivaAerobus, an airline owned by Mexico's largest bus company.

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