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Allegheny

Pittsburgh River Rescue saves gosling that sought cover near boat motor

Megan Guza
| Wednesday, May 16, 2018, 10:24 a.m.
Gabby, a lost gosling, awaits her trip to a wildlife preserve after River Rescue crews saved the lone baby goose from the motor of a rescue craft Tuesday, May 15, 2018.
Megan Guza | Tribune-Review
Gabby, a lost gosling, awaits her trip to a wildlife preserve after River Rescue crews saved the lone baby goose from the motor of a rescue craft Tuesday, May 15, 2018.
Gabby, a lost gosling, awaits her trip to a wildlife preserve after River Rescue crews saved the lone baby goose from the motor of a rescue craft Tuesday, May 15, 2018.
Megan Guza | Tribune-Review
Gabby, a lost gosling, awaits her trip to a wildlife preserve after River Rescue crews saved the lone baby goose from the motor of a rescue craft Tuesday, May 15, 2018.
Crew chief and diver Sara Vogt said the lost gosling was shivering and exhausted when they pulled the baby goose from the water Tuesday, May 15, 2018.
Department of Public Safety
Crew chief and diver Sara Vogt said the lost gosling was shivering and exhausted when they pulled the baby goose from the water Tuesday, May 15, 2018.

A wayward gosling received a helping hand and a safe place to sleep Tuesday night thanks to Pittsburgh River Rescue crews and police Chief Scott Schubert.

Crews were about to head out from their North Shore docking point to patrol the Ohio River during the Gabby Barrett concert about 6:30 p.m. when mechanical issues forced the crew to check the motor area of the craft.

Paramedic Dave Naples found a gosling covered in debris.

Crew Chief and diver Sara Vogt said that had there not been motor issues, they'd have never known the gosling was there.

“She was exhausted. She was spent,” Vogt said Wednesday morning. “I don't think she could even move her wings. She was shivering.”

Crew members wrapped the baby goose in a towel until they could put together a makeshift nest in a plastic bin. Schubert, who was at the river rescue station at the time, named the gosling Gabby.

“If it weren't for the concert, we might not have been patrolling, and the gosling probably wouldn't have made it,” Schubert said.

Crew Chief and diver Simon Taxel said ducks and geese generally stay out of the boathouse, but Vogt said she recently saw a mother goose and her brood struggling against the swift currents and theorized they might have taken cover near the boats.

Officers with the state Game Commission took Gabby to the Humane Animal Rescue Wildlife Center on Wednesday afternoon.

Megan Guza is a Tribune-Review staff writer.

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