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Allegheny

Pittsburgh offers free lawn care to seniors, homeowners with disabilities

Bob Bauder
| Wednesday, June 13, 2018, 4:18 p.m.
Pixabay

Pittsburgh is offering free grass-cutting service to older residents who unable to mow their lawns.

The program stems from legislation sponsored by City Councilwoman Theresa Kail-Smith and passed by council last year. The city budgeted $150,000 for the program and hopes to start in early July after lawn contractors are retained, according to Tim McNulty, spokesman for Mayor Bill Peduto.

Kail-Smith of Westwood said the service helps residents maintain their properties and avoid city code violations. She said it also helps to reduce blight.

“It helps the community look better by having grass cut, and it reduces the number of complaints to (the city's 311 response line),” she said. “It also helps people unable to maintain their properties stay in their homes.”

The program dubbed City Cuts is available for Pittsburgh residents who own their homes and are 62 or older, a veteran or disabled.

“We're asking you to tell us on the honor system that you're not able to do it,” McNulty said.

People can apply online through the City Cuts website or in person at any Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh branch in the city. They can also call 311 and request an application by mail.

City officials recommend applying online because it's the quickest path to approval.

The city has issued a request for proposals for grass-cutting services. Companies can bid on contracts through the city's Beacon website.

Kail-Smith has sponsored a similar program exclusively for her West End district since 2009 using Community Development Block Grant funding to hire contractors through competitive bidding.

“It's worked out wonderfully,” she said.

Bob Bauder is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 412-765-2312, bbauder@tribweb.com or via Twitter @bobbauder.

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